Webinar Series: Leave No One Behind in rural water supply, 16 April - 4 June 2019

Série de webinaires 2019 : «Ne laisser personne pour compte » dans l’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural, 16 avril 2019 - 4 juin 2019

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Safe Water: monitoring, data and decisions

Une eau potable gérée en toute sécurité: surveillance, données, décisions

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Événements

27.05.2019 - 16.06.2019

RWSN E-discussion: Cost effective ways to leave no-one behind • Online: https://dgroups.org/rwsn/rwsn_e-discussions

25.08.2019 - 30.08.2019

SIWI World Water Week Stockholm • Stockholm, Sweden

07.10.2019 - 11.10.2019

Water and Health University of North Carolina • Chapel Hill, USA

Nouvelles • Annonces

19.12.2018

RWSN to put the “Safe” in Safely Managed Drinking Water Une eau potable gérée en toute sécurité : l’importance de la qualité de l’eau pour de RWSN

Word from the Chair, Kelly Ann Naylor (UNICEF) Accessibility. Availability. Quality. These are the three criteria that define a safely managed drinking water service under SDG 6.1. While accessibility and availability were known challenges for rural water supply services, the scale of the problem of rural water quality was not well quantified, until last year’s WHO/ UNICEF JMP Update Report 2017 put the water quality issue firmly on the map for rural water supply. While 73% of the world’s population drinks water free from contamination bacteriological and chemical contamination, only 55% of the world’s rural population - just over half - drinks safe water. Furthermore, estimates for water quality are only available for 45% of the global population. The JMP report notes that these data suggest that levels of compliance with drinking water standards are likely to be low in developing countries. RWSN addresses many aspects of rural drinking water services, but there had not been a specific focus on water quality thus far. Given the importance of this issue for rural people, RWSN is proud to announce a new partnership with The Water Institute at UNC Chapel Hill to tackle the quality of water in rural water services. According to Professor Jamie Bartram (Director, The Water Institute at UNC), “this partnership will leverage the powerful RWSN platform and The Water Institute’s expertise in water quality and management to bring up to date evidence and methods to the members of the network. As a new Topic Leader in Mapping and Monitoring, The Water Institute aims to bring evidence and practice closer by facilitating lively discussion and producing practical guidance on Safely Managed Water.” You can find out more about this new partnership in the section below. Accessibility and availability of drinking water also remain critical issues for rural populations. Women and girls are responsible for water collection in 8 out of 10 households with water off premises, and 263 million people use water supplies more than 30 minutes from home. Likewise, many rural water systems face operation and maintenance challenges that can leave rural populations with long downtimes when spare parts or skilled technicians are not available to make the repair. RWSN’s Themes and online communities remain active on addressing Accessibility and Availability as part of the new strategy 2018-2023. The Sustainable Services Theme explores service delivery models to ensure continuity and quality of services. The Sustainable Groundwater Development Theme is concerned with the overall availability of the water resource itself, while the recently-launched topic on “Solar Pumping” allows exchange on advances in solar pumping technologies and field experiences of their use and management. The Mapping and Monitoring Theme is looking at how to reinforce in-country monitoring systems of water services. The Self-Supply Theme helps define the enabling environment that enables people to invest in and improve their own water systems. And cutting across all topics, the Leave No One Behind Theme emphasizes the need to have an inclusive approach to rural water, taking gender, disability, and marginalised populations into account to fulfil the human right to water. Next year’s World Water Day theme will be “Leaving No One Behind.” Now more than ever, Rural Water practitioners will be on the forefront to take up this challenge and address these persistent inequalities so that rural populations everywhere can drink water that is safe, available when needed, and accessible close to home. | »

05.12.2018

AfriAlliance and Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN) sharing knowledge AfriAlliance et le Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN) partagent leurs connaissances

Africa is one of the regions most in need of innovative solutions for tackling water and climate change-related challenges; yet many parts of Africa are also suffering from the lack of water-related skills and capacity as well as wide-spread institutional fragmentation. In this context, RWSN is pleased to announce that it has signed an MoU with the AfriAlliance. The AfriAlliance project, led by IHE Delft in the Netherlands, aims to better prepare Africa for future climate change challenges by having African and European stakeholders work together in the areas of water innovation, research, policy, and capacity development. RWSN and AfriAlliance will harness the power of our networks to share knowledge and connect research on climate and water issues, to enable cross-fertilisation of the AfriAlliance Action Groups and the RWSN thematic groups, and to build lasting networks in the water sector in Africa. We will explore the opportunities and conditions to jointly provide for strategic research and innovation for water and climate in Africa by specifically looking at how mandated African institutions can be supported to facilitate research and put innovation into use. | »

03.09.2018

The overlooked population dynamics of rural Africa Blog by Matthias Saladin

Rural population in Sub-Saharan Africa is projected to continue growing for decades to come. In spite of urbanization, rural populations are not going to disappear. Both as individuals and as organizations, we need to spend more efforts in reaching out to the people in rural areas, and we need to come up with more diversified strategies to facilitate the delivery of services to these people. | »

27.08.2018

Word from the Chair: Investing in the next generation for universal rural water services Investir dans la nouvelle génération pour des services en eau ruraux universels

Word from the RWSN Chair: Kelly Ann Naylor, UNICEF This month we celebrated International Youth Day (on August 12th). More than half of the world’s population today is under 30: 1.8 billion people are between the ages of 10-24. And nine out of 10 people between the ages 10 and 24 live in less developed countries (UNFPA, 2014). These demographic trends mean it is vital to ensure full participation of young people in rural water supplies. Whilst 1% of the global workforce works directly in water and sanitation jobs (UN, 2016) attracting skilled workers to rural areas remains a key constraint: according to GLAAS (2014), of the 67 countries that reported on systems operation and maintenance, only 11 had the capacity to operate and maintain their rural drinking systems. And globally women make up less than 17 percent of the water, sanitation, and hygiene labour force (IWA, 2016). Young people clearly have a role to play to ensure the Global Goals for rural water become a reality by 2030. Yet, 75% of young people in developing countries are either unemployed or in irregular or informal employment (viS4YE, 2015). The recruitment and development of young professionals will be critical to the future of the rural water sector. RWSN’s new Strategy 2018-2024 has embraced our work as an opportunity to engage with young people and empower them to be agents of change. This current generation of young people will be the ones leading the way- in our communities and countries- towards the achievement of the SDG vision of universal access to safe drinking water. Recent activities: Already this exciting agenda has been launched into action and we have some exceptional young water professionals leading the way: 6 early-career UPGro researchers from Kenya, Malawi, Ethiopia, Uganda and New Zealand had the opportunity to tell the story of their groundwater research to a packed auditorium at the 41st WEDC Conference in Nakuru, Kenya Shabana Abbas, from Pakistan, has gone from being a junior researcher in the UPGro programme to a full-time job at Aqua for All, in the Netherlands. Shabana is also the President of the Water Youth Network and a member of the REACH programme Junior Global Advisory Panel Muna Omar is an Ethiopian refugee and a young water professional, living and working in Sana’a, Yemen, undertaking monitoring and evaluation of humanitarian programmes in WASH. Muna took part in the RWSN-CapNet online course on Drilling Professionalisation. Read her story on the RWSN blog. More Coming Up: There will be other opportunities to get involved in Young Professional events in the months ahead. @Stockholm World Water Week The Youth for Water and Climate “Quality Assurance Lab” (Wednesday 29th): young fellows/ entrepreneurs will pitch their projects and present their posters to a series of reviewers who will work with them giving feedback on their projects. An informal event at the Swiss Water Partnership booth (Wednesday 29th from 4 pm to 6 pm): where 14 young entrepreneurs will pitch their project/ social enterprises to people present. @UNC Water & Health Conference Two RWSN Sessions are an opportunity for rural water and WASH professionals, young and old, to engage with the issues and meet each other: Pipe dream or possible: Reaching the furthest behind first in the WASH sector? Monitoring & Data for Rural Water: Different perspectives, common goals Join our growing community of Young Rural Water Professionals! The RWSN network has over 10,000 members and provides a unique platform to bring together young professionals and seasoned sector experts and practitioners from around the world. We encourage you to reach out to your colleagues who are Young Professionals to help shape the future next generation of RWSN! If you are under 35, Sign-up via the link below. | »

20.08.2018

Sharing experiences of data flows in water and sanitation Some reflections from AGUASAN Workshop 2018

AGUASAN is the Swiss Community of Practice for water and sanitation that has been running since 1984 and comprises regular meetings through the year and an annual week-long workshop focused on a specific topic, which this year was around role of data in decision-making in water and sanitation services. Around 40 participants attended at a really great training facility in Spiez, in central Switzerland. They came, not just from Swiss organisations, but from a wide range of partners (many who are active RWSN members). There were participants from Bangladesh, Tajikistan, Mozambique, Peru, Thailand, Mali, Pakistan, Benin, Egypt, Mongolia, the UK, South Africa, US and many more. Continue reading on the RWSN blog (link below) | »

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