RWSN Resources

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The Case for Manual Drilling in Africa

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Author: UNICEF
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: UNICEF
Institution: Practica Foundation, EnterpriseWorks/VITA

Achieving the MDGs for water supply in Sub-Saharan Africa is a daunting task because the magnitude of the problem is ever increasing. There are 284 million people living in rural areas without access to potable water. In order to reach these people, radical solutions, and low-cost soutions are needed - such as manual drilling.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

The Code of Practice for Cost-Effective Boreholes: Ghana Country Status Report

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Author: ADEKILE D. and C. KWEI
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This study examines the stage of water well drilling practices in Ghana. The work was supported by UNICEF Ghana, the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing, External Support Agencies, NGOs and private contractors and consultants.

The Importance of Manual Drilling in Africa

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Author: GAYA, S.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: UNICEF
Institution:

Presentation made at the National Workshop on Cost-Effective Boreholes in Khartoum, Sudan, November 2009

Towards cost-effective groundwater development in Sudan and in sub-Saharan Africa Personal Report of Workshop on Cost-Effective Boreholes, Khartoum, November 2009

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Author: CARTER, R. C.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Presentation addressed the issue of drilling cost estimation. Drilling companies and their clients need a systematic procedure for quantifying the costs of drilling.

Handpump Data 2009 (ARCHIVE - SEE UPDATE) Selected Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Handpump data for selected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (2007) Data for: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, DRC, Ethiopia, Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

FOR CITATION PURPOSES, THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPLACED BY:

Banks, B. & S. G. Furey (2016) What’s Working, Where, and for How Long. A 2016 Water Point Update to the RWSN (2009) statistics, GWC/Skat , RWSN, St. Gallen, Switzerland

(see link below)

Management for Sustainability Practical lessons from three studies on the management of rural water supply schemes.

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Author: TAYLOR, B.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WaterAid
Institution:

A major sustainability challenge threatens to undermine recent efforts to increase spending on rural water supply in Tanzania. Surveys have found that only 54% of existing rural waterpoints are functional, and that only two years after installation, already a quarter of waterpoints are no longer functioning. In the rush to spend new funds, there is a risk that the sustainability of new waterpoints could drop even lower if best practices are not followed and if standards are allowed to fall.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

May-day! May-Day! Our handpumps are not working! RWSN Perspective No 1

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Author: BAUMANN, E.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Estimates say that in Africa at all time 30% of the handpumps are not working. As with most complex issues, this failure has many causes. For sustained provision of rural water it is necessary that a variety of conditions are fulfilled.

What does that mean from the economic viewpoint? We can assume that in Sub-Saharan Africa 600,000 to 800,000 handpumps have been installed in the last 20 years. If 200,000 to 250,000 of these pumps are not working this represents a total investment of USD 1.2 to 1.5 billion.

Operation and Maintenance of Rural Water Supplies Challenging the community-based O&M paradigm.

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Author: CARTER, R. C.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

It is impossible to be closely involved in rural water supply provision in sub-Saharan Africa and to not fundamentally question the way operation and maintenance (O&M) are thought about and implemented. In this document I explore the concept of O&M; I discuss some myths about it; and I suggest some ways to improve it.

Sustainable Operation and Maintenance of Rural Water Supplies: Are we moving in the right direction? Perspectives No 3

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Author: HARVEY, P.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: UNICEF

The sustainability of rural water supplies is affected by a wide range of factors including policies, institutional issues, financing strategies, technology choice, technical quality, the environment, social factors, management models and supply chains.

InterAide Support to Operation and Maintenance of rural Water Supplies in Malawi in 2008 Member's Experiences No.1

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Author: DE SAINT MÉLOIR, B.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN/Inter Aide
Institution:

The NGO InterAide has experience of supporting operation and maintenance of rural water supplies. Initiatives started in 1999 in Lilongwe and Zomba districts where there are now a total of 59 shops selling handpump spare parts and 84 private sector area mechanics repairing handpumps. Based on these fruitfull experiences InterAide started (first with European Union funds, then with Pro Victimis Fundation funds) a new Operation and Maintenance project in 2008 in the three districts of Mchinji, Dowa and Salima located in the central region of Malawi. As about 80% of handpumps installed in Malawi are Afridev, InterAide decided to initially focus on this hand pump.
This report provides a description of the project, including the financial and human resource inputs.

Afridev: Handpump Maintenance Card

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Author: ERPF, K.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution: Skat

Maintenance Card for Weekly, Monthly and Yearly Checks (Revision 1-2009)

Achievements and Lessons Learned from Uganda Self-Supply Pilot Project (2006 - 2008) 34th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009

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Author: KIWANUKA, J.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

This document provides the achievements and lessons learned from the Uganda self-supply pilot Project (2006-2008). The pilot project followed a research study undertaken in 2005 that indicated that self-supply initiatives existed in the Uganda rural water sector. Following the study a pilot project was launched in September 2006 and involved engagement of two local NGOs with support from Government.

Assessing the Potential for Self Supply in Zambia 34th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009

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Author: MUNKONGE, M. A. and P. HARVEY
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

The Millennium Development Goal target for safe water supply is currently unlikely to be met in Zambia. In order to serve the population that is unlikely to be reached under conventional community-based water supply programmes, alternative approaches to water supply service provision need to be explored. One such alternative is the Self Supply approach which encourages households to develop and improve their own infrastructure incrementally.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Developing low-cost household water supply options: the potential of Self Supply in Ethiopia 34th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009

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Author: WORKNEH, P. S., DEVERILL, P. A. and A. G. WOLDESELASSIE
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

Ethiopia has launched a Universal Access Plan (UAP) to achieve safe water supply and sanitation for the country’s 77 million people by 2012. This would mean providing safe water service to 50.9 million new users in just 7 years. The government recently reviewed the progress of UAP and concluded that it would be challenging to achieve its targets with the existing implementation approach. The review strongly recommended that low-cost options need to be pursued to accelerate progress.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Integrating a new approach - the example of Self Supply 34th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009

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Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

In the present climate of Demand Responsive Approaches and budget support, it is getting increasingly difficult to introduce new ideas. The temptation is to continue with 'business as usual', with little room for questioning its sustainability and effectiveness or exploring new approaches.

Preliminary Report on Self Supply, Luapula Provence, Zambia

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Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: UNICEF, WSP

In June 2008 UNICEF entered into an agreement to fund the piloting of Self Supply in rural water in three districts of Luapula province. The agreement was with WaterAid in Milenge and Development Aid from People to People (DAPP) in Chiengi, Nchelenge.

Progress Report on Self Supply/Risk Reduction in Mali

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Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: UNICEF, WSP

This report summarises progress up to April 2009 with respect to the risk reduction/self supply approach being followed in Mali to encourage households to improve their water supplies. Over 150 traditional wells have improved protection as a result of this approach.

Self Supply in Mali Early Steps towards an Innovatory Approach

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Author: OSBERT, N. and S. SUTTON
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

The introduction of a new concept cannot be rushed. It is necessary to go through a process in which stakeholders have the opportunity, at various stages, to assess its relevance to them as members of government or local administration and, most of all, as end-users. Mali was one of the first countries to start this process with respect to Self Supply in rural water.

Afridev: Carte de Maintenance pour le Pompe Manuel Afridev

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Author: ERPF, K.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution: Skat

Carte de Maintenance pour le Pompe Manuel Afridev

Afridev: Carta Manuntenção das Bombas Manual Afridev

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Author: ERPF, K.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution: Skat

Carta Manuntenção das Bombas Manual Afridev

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