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Malawi: Technical Manual for Water Wells and Groundwater Monitoring Systems and Standard Operating Procedures for Groundwater

This technical manual describes borehole aspects associated with groundwater development mainly for rural domestic supply and groundwater monitoring boreholes and the associated groundwater monitoring or management aspects thereof. This manual is an update of the earlier manual by the Ministry of Water Development (MWD), 2001, with a chapter on groundwater monitoring, database management and water permits added. The accompanying documents as Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS) for groundwater sampling, aquifer pumping test, groundwater level monitoring, groundwater use permitting, drilling and construction of national monitoring boreholes, operation and management of the national groundwater database.

The documents were produced under National Water Development Program 2 funded by the African Development Bank (AFDB) through consultative consultancy by Aurecon Consultants in 2012 and edition for printing was supported by JICA in 2016. | »

What’s Working, Where, and for How Long A 2016 Water Point Update to the RWSN (2009) statistics

• An average of 78% of water points are functional across the 11 countries analyzed.

• The high failure rates early after installation are troubling: almost 15% after one year and 25% of water points are non-functional by their fourth year after installation. This indicates widespread problems with poor quality water point installation, due to a range of problems that may include professionalism and skills around contracts, construction and supervision; borehole siting; lack of quality control of hardware; or lack of post-construction monitoring and problem resolution.

• Handpumps are often singled out as technology that fails, but analysis of other water point types show similar functionality levels, and that tens of thousands of handpumps are providing a service

This poster was peer-reviewed and presented at the 7th RWSN Forum in Abidjan, Cote'Ivoire 2016.

It replaces "Handpump Data 2009 Selected Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa" (2009) | »

Quality Assurance of Unicef Drilling Programes for Boreholes in Malawi Consultancy Services

This review was commissioned by UNICEF to snapshot the current effectiveness of procurement and field processes related to the drilling, the role of the district councils in these implementation processes and indeed the quality of the finished water point products. This with an objective of identifying weaknesses and remedying them in future programmes. | »

Effective Joint Sector Reviews for Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) A Study and Guidance - 2016

This is the first consolidated and referenced multicountry study of Water or Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Joint Sector Reviews (JSRs). The study report and associated Learning Note and Poster provide an understanding of JSR processes and practical guidance on how to introduce and improve them. The study sets out a methodology in the form of visual checklists to reflect and take stock of WASH JSR processes. This could also form the foundation for subsequent cross-country comparisons of the JSR process.

The publications provide an analysis of JSRs as well as practical guidance on how to introduce and effectively manage them. The initial focus of the work was on JSRs in fragile states. However, the contested definitions of a fragile state, arbitrary thresholds as well as the realization that there are common issues with respect to JSRs in nonfragile countries led to a widening of the scope of countries studied. Notably, all countries included are considerably donor dependant for WASH. The study considered 25 countries, and found that between 2001 and 2015, WASH JSRs had taken place in 19 of them.

Note that these documents are review copies. | »

Review of Self-supply and its support services in African countries Synthesis Report

Over the past decades, in many countries, significant progress has been achieved in improving access to rural water supplies. However, it will be almost impossible to reach universal access by using community supply models alone, as this approach will simply be too costly. For achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and ensuring universal access to water for all, new approaches and a shift in mindset and policies are needed. Supported Self-supply is a very cost effective service delivery approach which is complementary to communal supplies, is aligned with Human Rights principles, supports equity and inclusiveness and achieving several SDGs.
This Synthesis report summarises the results of a UNICEF funded review of supported Self-supply in Zambia and in Zimbabwe which was conducted in 2015 and reflects on findings from discussions at national workshops in Zambia, Zimbabwe and Malawi and from a webinar on supported Self-supply and Human Rights to Water organized by the Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN). | »

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