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Measuring functionality and performance levels Technical brief

This technical brief is aimed at sharing the learning and approaches developed by the UPGro Hidden Crisis Research Project to look at how the functionality and performance levels of boreholes equipped with handpumps (HPBs), can be assessed using a common set of definitions and methods. A tiered approach to defining and measuring functionality is found to be useful to examining functionality for different scales and purposes of monitoring. This report is aimed at national and regional actors involved in the provision and monitoring of rural water supply functionality.

The brief sets out the tiered functionality definitions, and accompanying survey methods, which were developed by the project and have been applied in functionality surveys across Ethiopia, Uganda and Malawi. | »

The 2019 RWSN directory of rural water supply services, tariffs, management models and lifecycle costs 2019 Edition [ENGLISH]

The rural water supply sector is undergoing a period of change. In response to the challenges of achieving universal access to safe, affordable drinking water and sustaining those services, there has been increasing innovation in different types of rural water service models.

This Directory is intended to show the growing range of management options. Some are novel interventions that are still being piloted, others have been established for a decade or more.

Also includes: Handpump Statistics 2019 (from WPDx data from Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia-Pacific)

Aussi disponible en français | »

Water Supply Borehole Drilling Supervision Training - Water Futures Programme

This document summarises a 5-day ‘Water Supply Borehole Drilling Supervision’ training programme held in Balaka / Ntcheu Districts (Malawi) between the dates of 1 to 5 October 2018. This initiative was funded by the Scottish Government and delivered through the University of Strathclyde’s Climate Justice Fund: Water Futures Programme (CJF Programme).

The sessions were facilitated and delivered by staff from Malawi Government’s Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Water Development (MoAIWD), University of Strathclyde (Scotland) and Baseflow (Malawian groundwater focussed NGO). The sessions were aimed primarily at district level field staff from MoAIWD District Water Offices with responsibilities for field level supervision of water supply borehole drilling. Attendees were also welcomed from Regional and National MoAIWD Offices, as well as local and international NGOs.

By the end of the week, each attendee had viewed each step of water supply borehole drilling, construction and testing, through a series of field and classroom sessions delivered by experienced water sector professionals. Malawian standards and international best practice were highlighted and emphasised throughout the week. Attendees were encouraged to get ‘hands-on’ taking samples, measurements and making decisions themselves. | »

Malawi: Technical Manual for Water Wells and Groundwater Monitoring Systems and Standard Operating Procedures for Groundwater

This technical manual describes borehole aspects associated with groundwater development mainly for rural domestic supply and groundwater monitoring boreholes and the associated groundwater monitoring or management aspects thereof. This manual is an update of the earlier manual by the Ministry of Water Development (MWD), 2001, with a chapter on groundwater monitoring, database management and water permits added. The accompanying documents as Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS) for groundwater sampling, aquifer pumping test, groundwater level monitoring, groundwater use permitting, drilling and construction of national monitoring boreholes, operation and management of the national groundwater database.

The documents were produced under National Water Development Program 2 funded by the African Development Bank (AFDB) through consultative consultancy by Aurecon Consultants in 2012 and edition for printing was supported by JICA in 2016. | »

What’s Working, Where, and for How Long A 2016 Water Point Update to the RWSN (2009) statistics

• An average of 78% of water points are functional across the 11 countries analyzed.

• The high failure rates early after installation are troubling: almost 15% after one year and 25% of water points are non-functional by their fourth year after installation. This indicates widespread problems with poor quality water point installation, due to a range of problems that may include professionalism and skills around contracts, construction and supervision; borehole siting; lack of quality control of hardware; or lack of post-construction monitoring and problem resolution.

• Handpumps are often singled out as technology that fails, but analysis of other water point types show similar functionality levels, and that tens of thousands of handpumps are providing a service

This poster was peer-reviewed and presented at the 7th RWSN Forum in Abidjan, Cote'Ivoire 2016.

It replaces "Handpump Data 2009 Selected Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa" (2009) | »

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