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What’s Working, Where, and for How Long A 2016 Water Point Update to the RWSN (2009) statistics

• An average of 78% of water points are functional across the 11 countries analyzed.

• The high failure rates early after installation are troubling: almost 15% after one year and 25% of water points are non-functional by their fourth year after installation. This indicates widespread problems with poor quality water point installation, due to a range of problems that may include professionalism and skills around contracts, construction and supervision; borehole siting; lack of quality control of hardware; or lack of post-construction monitoring and problem resolution.

• Handpumps are often singled out as technology that fails, but analysis of other water point types show similar functionality levels, and that tens of thousands of handpumps are providing a service

This poster was peer-reviewed and presented at the 7th RWSN Forum in Abidjan, Cote'Ivoire 2016.

It replaces "Handpump Data 2009 Selected Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa" (2009) | »

The Technology Applicability Framework. A Participatory Tool to Validate Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Technologies for Low-Income Urban Areas in S. Hostettler et al. (eds.), Technologies for Development,

Decision-makers as well as practitioners in the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) sector are facing serious challenges to keep existing WASH infrastructure in operation or to ensure provision of lasting and adequate WASH services. In many countries there are no tested procedures for assessing sustainability and scalability of new or existing technologies for providing adequate and lasting WASH services in a specific context.

The TAF was field tested on 13 WASH technologies in three countries: Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Uganda. This paper presents the findings from the testing of the TAF and highlights potentials and limits of its applicability
for assessing the sustainable application and scalability of WASH technologies.
Relevant documents on the methodology, the testing as well as case studies and manuals are accessible in the public domain through www.washtechnologies.net. | »

Handpump Standardisation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Seeking a Champion RWSN Publication 2015-1

Handpump standardisation is the formal or informal mechanism that governs the varieties of community handpumps used within a particular country. In a handful of countries this also includes stand-ard handpump designs. With over a million handpumps in sub-Saharan Africa and new installations every day, handpump standardisation is still vital for the policy and practices of governments and implementing organisations. While rural water practitioners are polarised about the future of formal standardisation, the extent of informal standardisation is of significant importance to the sustain-ability of handpumps across the continent. Of the thirty-five countries in sub-Saharan using handpumps, formal standardisation has emerged in fifteen through regulations (nine countries), and endorsements (six countries). However in the remaining countries, informal standardisation determines what handpumps are installed where, either through recommendations (fourteen countries), or de facto standardisation (six countries). | »

Rainwater Harvesting: harnessing the storm Briefing Note on the RAIN-RWSN webinar series 2014

This 4 page briefing note summarises the key message from the RAIN-RWSN webinars of 2014, which included examples from Honduras, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Mali, Uganda, Somalia, Madagascar and Nepal. | »

Webinar Series 2014 (RAIN - RWSN) Interactive webinars that aim promote sharing of knowledge and experience in rainwater harvesting

The idea is simple. There is hardly a place in the world where it never rains. Rainwater belongs to everyone. And the methods to collect, store, use and reuse rainwater (to ‘harvest’ rainwater) are easy to apply. So why not spread those methods around the world?

RAIN Foundation and RWSN are collaborating on increasing understanding and uptake of rainwater harvesting, and connecting with people who are looking for help in implementing these systems.

This series of webinars show cases some of the innovative approaches being undertaken around the world. | »

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