RWSN Resources

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- Atelier Final, Dakar, Senegal, 8 Avrill 2015: Utilisation de la télédétection et de la modélisation du terrain pour l'identification des zones favorables aux forages manuels - Final Workshop, Dakar, 8 April 2015: Remote sensing and terrain modelling to identify suitable zones for manual drilling in Africa

Downloads: 328


Author: FUSSI, F. et al.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher:
Institution:

This set of presentation was given at the closing workshop in Dakar, 8 April 2015 of the UPGro Catalyst project : "Use of remote sensing and terrain modelling to map manual drilling potential in Senegal and Guinea"

3rd HTN International Workshop, India - Proceedings Government and Civil Society Partnership

Downloads: 18


Author: WISHART, G.
Year of Publishing: 2000
Publisher: RWSN (incl. HTN)
Institution: Skat

This document reports the proceedings of the Network for Cost Effective Technologies for Water Supply and Sanitation (HTN) Workshop held in Hyderabad, India, 6-10 March 2000.

5ème Forum RWSN 2006 - Ghana

Downloads: 13


Author: JONES, J. et J. DOYEN
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Amplifier l'Entreprenariat Local en matière d'Approvisionnement en Eua en Milieu Rural pour atteindre les OMDs Compte Rendu en Francais

6th RWSN Forum - Event Report Rural Water Supply in the 21st Century: Myths of the Past, Visions for the Future

Downloads: 38


Author: FUREY S. G. & DANERT K.
Year of Publishing: 2012
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Full details of the event available at http://rwsnforum.wordpress.com

The 2011 6th Rural Water Supply Network Forum in Kampala set out a vision for the future. It provided the opportunity for 480 participants from 54 countries to share their experiences and chart key next steps along the path for rural water supplies. This includes actions determined at the Forum and the Kampala Rural Water Supply Commitments with ten statements. These summarise a commitment to accelerating progress in inclusive and sustainable rural water supplies wherever those services are absent or under-performing.
As well as being opened and closed by Hon. Maria Mutagamba, Minister of Water and Environment, we were kindly joined by a sizeable delegation from the Government of South Sudan and the Hon. Ato Kebede Gerba, Minister for Water and Energy for Ethiopia.

A Brief History of Hand Drilled Wells in Niger Only the beginning

Downloads: 221


Author: DANERT, K.
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution: RWSN

This field note describes the history of hand drilling and water-lifting techniques introduced in Niger over 30 years and now firmly in the hands of local enterprises, farmers and water users. Recommendations for the way forward are included.

A Brief Review of Groundwater for Rural Water Supply in sub-Saharan Africa Technical Report

Downloads: 534


Author: MACDONALD, A., and J. DAVIES
Year of Publishing: 2000
Publisher: British Geological Survey
Institution: DFID, NERC

Groundwater has proved the most reliable resource for meeting rural water demand in sub-Saharan Africa. There are four main hydrogeological environments in SSA. Each of these broad categories requires different methods for finding and abstracting groundwater.

A Community Resource Book for the Water and Sanitation Sector

Downloads: 550


Author: DWD
Year of Publishing: 2007
Publisher: Ministry of Water and Environment, Republic of Uganda
Institution: Directorate of Water Development

This Community Resource Book has been prepared to provide communities, and especially any active person or group within communities (e.g. Water User Groups), with good knowledge in matters concerning the planning for, management and maintenance of water supply and sanitation facilities. The Book also provides guidance on how to improve the hygiene and sanitation practices at community and household level. In addition it outlines the roles and responsibilities of the respective communities, its leaders as well as key bodies and institutions that are involved in the process of implementing, rehabilitating and maintaining rural water and sanitation activities.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

A Comparative Evaluation Of Ultra Deep-Well Handpumps MSc THESIS Academic Year: 2011 - 2012

Downloads: 239


Author: CORNET, L.
Year of Publishing: 2012
Publisher: Cranfield University
Institution: SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCES Water Management: Community Water and Sanitation

Permission has been granted to publish on the RWSN website by the author, Lucas Cornet, and by Dr Alison Parker (Cranfield University) and Erik Harvey (WaterAid)

Abstract

Handpump technology is documented as being the best option for the water supply of rural communities in the developing world. However, it has been observed that the amount of available handpump models significantly drops as water tables get deeper. Many handpumps are therefore expected to operate beyond their design specifications, which is responsible for many failures of handpump projects. This paper compares a total of 12 ultra deep-well handpumps (UDWHPs), with a pumping lift higher than 60 m, in terms of technologies, materials, outputs, costs and maintenance potentialities.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

A comparative study between “Rope pumps” and conventional piston pumps on water quality and other sustainability parameters Appropriate technologies for rural water supply

Downloads: 100


Author: COLORU, B., S. MGAYA and R. POZZI-TAUBERT
Year of Publishing: 2012
Publisher: Fondazione ACRA-CCS, SHIPO
Institution:

In Tanzania there now are some 5000 Rope pumps both for small communities and Households. To compare Rope pumps with piston pumps like Afridev and Nira pumps regarding water quality, cost per capita and other aspects, the organisation ACRA effected a Comparative study. Some conclusions of the study are:
- Rural communities do not prefer piston pumps above Rope pump
-The water quality of tested Rope pumps is lower than Piston pumps but this is mainly due to bad installation. If installed right there is not much difference in water quality.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

A Comparative Study on Water Well Drilling Costs in Kenya

Downloads: 3769


Author: DOYEN, J.
Year of Publishing: 2003
Publisher: UNDP-World Bank
Institution:

This paper presents the main findings of a comparative study on water well drilling costs in Kenya. It outlines the main factors influencing the costs per unit in various geological environments. The study focused primarily on cost factors that can be influenced by geological investigations, well design and construction supervision.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

A Decade of WPM RWSN: Mapping and Monitoring

Downloads: 54


Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

The first webinar reviewed the development of WPM over the past decade, focusing on Malawi, the first country in which the practice was introduced. The key presenters provided dual perspectives of NGO and government actors, which demonstrated the varied methodologies for reporting water supply data, the extent to which data monitoring has impacted decision making and its role in extending equitable and sustainable service delivery. Presentations and discussion assessed the practice, policy, tools and technologies of monitoring and WPM, following its evolution and bringing to question whether WPM is currently a practical and sustainable solution given the reality of resources and government capacities.

A Hidden Resource: Household-led rural water supply in Ethiopia

Downloads: 97


Author: SUTTON, S., BUTTERWORTH, J. and MEKONTA, L.
Year of Publishing: 2012
Publisher: IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre
Institution:

This report brings together the findings of two complementary research studies on the role of Self Supply in rural water services provision in different regions of Ethiopia. Self Supply involves households taking the lead in their own development, including investment in the construction, upgrading and maintenance of their own water sources, lifting devices and storage facilities. Traditional wells, which are usually family-owned, are the most common type of source and are the focus of this report. Various types of lifting device are used, starting from a rope and bucket. Rope pumps are being promoted as a step ahead, and in some specific areas, diesel or electric pumps are common. Until now, there has been relatively little information available about the performance of family or traditional wells, with water quality studies, for example the Rapid Assessment of Drinking Water Quality, RADWQ (WHO/ UNICEF, 2010), tending to focus on community sources such as handpumps.

A preliminary study of training artisans in upgradeable techniques for family owned wells

Downloads: 76


Author: MORGAN, P. and A. KANYEMBA
Year of Publishing: 2012
Publisher: Aquamor Pvt Ltd
Institution:

Several years ago Zimbabwe embarked on a program of upgrading family owned wells. This program was fully endorsed by the GOZ and operated under the MOHCW. The program has been well documented in papers and other publications. This program was based on the fact that for many decades individual families had chosen to upgrade their own wells privately and outside the formal GOZ rural water supply and sanitation program.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

A short history of the Zimbabwe Bush Pump Water and Sanitation in Zimbabwe

Downloads: 43


Author: MORGAN, P.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: Aquamor Pvt Ltd
Institution:

A presentation illustrating the history of the Zimbabwe Bush Pump from 1933 to the present day.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

A Synthesis of the 2013 RWSN Water Point Mapping Group e-discussion

Downloads: 88


Author: PEARCE, J. and C. HOWMAN
Year of Publishing: 2013
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: WaterAid

A three week e-discussion was held on Dgroups discussing questions around water point mapping

A Synthesis of the 2013 RWSN Water Point Mapping Group e-discussion: Week 1 Planning

Downloads: 12


Author:
Year of Publishing: 2013
Publisher:
Institution: RWSN

A Synthesis of the 2013 RWSN Water Point Mapping Group e-discussion: Week 2 Analysis Reporting Dissemination

Downloads: 3


Author:
Year of Publishing: 2013
Publisher:
Institution: RWSN

A Synthesis of the 2013 RWSN Water Point Mapping Group e-discussion: Week 3 Decision Making & Updating

Downloads: 6


Author:
Year of Publishing: 2013
Publisher:
Institution: RWSN

A vision for achieving sustainable rural water services for all RWSN Field Note 2011-9

Downloads: 43


Author: CARTER, R. & LOCKWOOD, H.
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: RWSN Executive Steering Committee

This document sets out the Rural Water Supply Network’s broad vision for the next two decades by defining what we believe are the core principles upon which reliable, safe and equitable services can be provided. The articulation of this vision will be different in each country and be determined by local contexts and priorities. Consequently the purpose of this document is to provide national policy makers, practitioners, development partners and water consumers with an overarching framework which can help them consider their own respective roles and approaches to the provision of water supply services to rural populations.

About costs and financial organisation to maintain access to safe water in Sierra Leone rural areas

Downloads: 5


Author:
Year of Publishing: 0000
Publisher: Inter Aide
Institution:

This short note gives some key elements on the following questions: What is the cost of maintaining a pump in rural areas of Sierra Leone? How much does it represent per family user? Is it affordable? How can these contributions be organised and managed transparently at village level? The main conclusion is that, once a pump is restored to a certain standard, its yearly maintenance is relatively cheap and can, in most of the situations, easily be afforded and managed by the users, providing some conditions are fulfilled.

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