RWSN Resources

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Rural Water Supply Network - Annual Report 2016 Enabling practitioners, professionals and ultimately water users to make informed decisions on how to improve and maintain access to safe water in rural areas.

Downloads: 141


Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2017
Publisher: Skat Foundtion
Institution: Rural Water Supply Network

The focus for the Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN) in 2016 was preparing for, and managing the 7th RWSN Forum in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, from 29th November to 2nd December with the title “Water for Everyone”. This was the first RWSN Forum to take place in a francophone country in the 25 years since the creation of the network.

Throughout 2016 specific in-country activities included a short-course on Procurement, Contract Management and Costing and Pricing in Zambia and a participative analysis of Manual Drilling in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Workshops organized by the World Bank in Bangkok and Lima on sustainable services drew together government agencies in both regions. Key lessons from both events fed into the RWSN Forum under the RWSN Theme “Sustainable Services”.

RWSN continued to work on strengthening the links between research and practice on groundwater by disseminating the outputs from UPGro (Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor) research to the RWSN membership as well as fostering direct linkages between groundwater experts and water supply professionals.

Proceedings of the 7th RWSN Forum 29 Nov - 2 Dec 2016, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire

Downloads: 63


Author: FUREY, S. G. (editor)
Year of Publishing: 2017
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution: RWSN

The 2016 Rural Water Supply Network Forum in Abidjan was the first global gathering to consider the practical challenge of how everyone worldwide can get access to safe, affordable water by 2030. It was also the first RWSN Forum to take place in a francophone country, in the 25 years since the creation of the network.
The Forum gathered 467 rural water sector practitioners from over 300 organisations from 64 countries in Africa, Asia, Americas, and Europe, in a bilingual (English/French) four day event. It was opened by the Prime Minister of Côte d’Ivoire, Mr Daniel Kaplan Duncan. We were joined by HE State Minster James Dengchol Tot, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Electricity of Ethiopia, as well as a delegation from AMCOW.

This Forum proceedings compiles all peer-reviewed materials. Separate downloads and links to the films can be found at: https://rwsn7.net/content/

RWSN Quarterly Newsletters - ENGLISH Archive of current and past newsletters

Downloads: 1124


Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution:

RWSN members receive a quarterly email newsletter,which is available in English and French.

PDF versions are posted here, Since 2012, email versions are posted via dgroups (http://dgroups.org/rwsn)

Bulletin trimestriel RWSN

Downloads: 629


Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution:

Les membres de RWSN recevoir un bulletin électronique trimestriel, qui est disponible en anglais et en français.

Les versions PDF sont affichés ici, depuis 2012, les versions électroniques sont transmis via dgroups (http://dgroups.org/rwsn)

S'IL VOUS PLAÎT NOTE QUE AVANT JUILLET 2012 PLUSIEURS DES LIENS CONSULTER LE SITE WEB ET VIEUX SO ne fonctionne plus à partir de 2013. Cependant, tous les documents ont été transférés sur le nouveau site

Review of Self-financed Water Supply in Milenge district, Zambia Country Report Zambia

Downloads: 63


Author: Olschewski A., Sutton S., Ngoma M.
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution: UNICEF

According to the UN Human rights to water and sanitation note (2015) there are three major management models for water supply, one of which is the “individual on-site solution” known as Self-supply. Self-supply is defined as incremental investments to improve access to water and quality of water financed by household investment. This report aims to present ‘adequate strong evidence to support or negate Self-supply acceleration as a service delivery model’ in Zambia. It is based on a review study of piloting of self-financed traditional well improvement in Milenge District, Luapula Province, one of the two poorest districts in the poorest province in Zambia. During the piloting also specific support services were provided such as facilitation of a loan scheme and training of local masons to iprove Self-supply so that there was supported Self-supply as service delivery model.

The study included extensive dry season surveys of waterpoints (200), households (150) and interviews with stakeholders at all levels, undertaken between June and August 2015.

Review of Upgraded Family Well Programme in Makoni & Buhera districts, Manicaland Province, Zimbabwe Country Report Zimbabwe

Downloads: 45


Author: Olschewski A., Matimati R., Waterkeyn A.
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution: UNICEF

This report aims to present the impact of a programme for the upgrading of traditional wells in rural Zimbabwe. The study focuses on two districts in Manicaland province, Makoni and Buhera, where self-financed improvements through the UFW programme were supported some 20 years ago. The study included extensive dry-season surveys of water-points, interviews with households and with stakeholders at all levels that were conducted between September and October 2015. Water quality samples were taken both from sources (from 50 community water points, from 50 traditional wells and from 100 upgraded family wells) and at point-of-use (200 samples).

Rainwater Harvesting in Thailand: Learning from the World Champions RWSN Field Note 2016-1

Downloads: 318


Author: Matthias Saladin
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: RWSN

This field note provides an overview and analysis of the historic developments of promoting Domestic Rainwater Harvesting (DRWH) in Thailand between 1980 and 2015. Based on literature reviews and interviews with stakeholders a series of factors were identified which made the promotion of DRWH in Thailand an exceptionally successful example of diffusion of innovations. Among the key factors identified were policies, market structure, pre-existing habits, affordability, supply chain and climate. No single factor was decisive but several of them occurring simultaneously made it possible for an enabling environment to form and make the initiative flourish even after government funding ran out (most of the Thai Jars, which are most commonly used for rainwater storage, were actually delivered through the private sector and paid by the consumers).
In spite of its large-scale success, the Thai Jar Experience is not a blueprint for replication elsewhere but points out to the importance of cultural and economic aspects, as well as to an enabling environment in general.

Manual Drilling Compendium 2015 RWSN Publication 2015-2

Downloads: 1483


Author: DANERT K.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Skat
Institution: Skat

Manual drilling refers to several drilling methods that rely on human energy to construct a borehole and complete a water supply. The various techniques can be used in areas where formations are quite soft and groundwater is relatively shallow.

Manual drilling can provide safe drinking water. The equipment can easily be transported to remote, or difficult to serve populations which would otherwise be left behind. The lower costs compared to machine drilling are appreciated by households, businesses and governments. Manual drilling also provides local employment.

Manual drilling methods are being used to provide water for drinking and other domestic needs at least 36 countries around the world. In some places, manual drilling methods are well established.

The compendium provides a useful overview for those wishing to further examine the impacts and challenges of manual drilling, and, more importantly, improve practices on the ground. It is hoped that the document will spur others to undertake fur-ther studies as well as research to document stories and analyse the promotion, uptake and use of manually drilled boreholes. In addition, the compendium should also enable those promoting manual drilling to realise that they are certainly not alone in their endeavours!

Rain water harvesting in the homestead

Downloads: 309


Author: MORGAN, P.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Aquamor
Institution: Aquamor

Rainwater harvesting is the very well established concept of collecting rainwater for domestic use and for plant irrigation. Most commonly the rain is collected from the roofs of houses and passes down the gutter into a tank, where it is held before use. Its use will continue after the rainy season is over. The concept has been known since ancient times being practiced by the Romans and before. Many fine works have been written about rainwater harvesting – none better in Southern Africa than the work of John Gould working in Botswana. More recently the RWSN has played particular attention to it.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

RWSN Webinar Series 2015

Downloads: 518


Author: Kerstin Danert
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: RWSN

Presenters from more than 25 different organisations, working in over 20 countries share their practical experiences and research findings. Participants have the opportunity to ask questions, and meet others with similar interests at the events. Topic covered include:
- radio for rural water supplies, drawing on practical experiences from Kenya and Tanzania.
- Self-supply in emergency and development contexts, and we shall be hearing from Sierra Leone as well as Ethiopia, and on the costs and quality of self-supply as well as government roles.
- a series of webinars on groundwater.
- experiences about dealing with gender, violence and access to WASH
- rainwater harvesting
- etc.

All of the presentations and links to the recordings will be posted here within two to three days of each webinar.

Short report on Self-supply Seminar at the “My Water-my business” event 20th March 2015 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Downloads: 270


Author: OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution:

In the Growth & Transformation Plan of Ethiopia specific sector targets are defined for improving access and services for WASH. A comprehensive implementation framework has been developed and endorsed, the One WASH National program, which guides all actors of the Ethiopian WASH sector in their collective efforts for implementation of WASH related activities towards the defined targets. Within the One WASH National program Self-supply is listed as an option additional to communal water supply to provide access to water for households or group of households.

This input paper summarizes some reflections from selected inputs provided at the seminar on 20th March on Self-supply and its acceleration.

The Technology Applicability Framework. A Participatory Tool to Validate Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Technologies for Low-Income Urban Areas in S. Hostettler et al. (eds.), Technologies for Development,

Downloads: 99


Author: Olschewski, A. and V. Casey
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Springer International Publishing
Institution:

Decision-makers as well as practitioners in the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) sector are facing serious challenges to keep existing WASH infrastructure in operation or to ensure provision of lasting and adequate WASH services. In many countries there are no tested procedures for assessing sustainability and scalability of new or existing technologies for providing adequate and lasting WASH services in a specific context.

The TAF was field tested on 13 WASH technologies in three countries: Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Uganda. This paper presents the findings from the testing of the TAF and highlights potentials and limits of its applicability
for assessing the sustainable application and scalability of WASH technologies.
Relevant documents on the methodology, the testing as well as case studies and manuals are accessible in the public domain through www.washtechnologies.net.

Short Summary on RWSN & World Vision Webinar series on Self-supply February & March 2015

Downloads: 15


Author: OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution: RWSN

This short summary highlights some of the issues that emerged from the presentations and discussions.

Self-supply News - Ethiopia

Downloads: 28


Author: SSWG
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: WAS-RoPSS Project
Institution:

Self Supply News is a bi-monthly newsletter issued by Self Supply Working Group (SSWG) of Ethiopia, which is a forum of government institutions and development partners. JICA WAS-RoPSS Project is currently taking lead to compile this newsletter.

{Editor's note: if you have copies of earlier editions, which we can archive here then please contact us}

Hand drilling a shallow tube-well in Zimbabwe and fitting a simple “Bailer-bucket” for water lifting

Downloads: 78


Author: MORGAN, P.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Aquamor
Institution: Aquamor

The construction of the lighter duty, simple hand operated drilling rig has been described in another manual and was designed for drilling shallow tube wells in softer soil formations, which occur in some areas of Zimbabwe. Currently the drilling stems extend to a maximum of 12m. Staff members of the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare are familiar with local shallow ground water conditions in Zimbabwe. A depth of 12m is suitable for the use of this simple rig in combination with simple water raising devices like the “Bailer-Bucket” Pump and Blair Pump.
This manual describes the test drilling of a tube-well in Epworth, near Harare, Zimbabwe and the construction and fitting of a PVC casing and filter mechanism. It also describes the construction of a simple “Bailer-Bucket” pump and the head works at the head of the tube well. Of particular significance is the part played by the family itself by making the water raising device – a tubular bucket fitted with non-return valve and handle. The design of the “pump” is very simple and easily made within the home. The chances of continued operation and maintenance are this considerably improved.

Estimating Private Domestic Well Use in the United States: A Pilot Study in Oklahoma

Downloads: 42


Author: WEAVER, J, MURRAY, A, KREMER, F, BLACKWOOD, K and MCELMURRY, A
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: United States Environmental Protection Agency
Institution: United States Environmental Protection Agency

Private domestic wells are not subject to the testing requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act and are susceptible to contamination by natural and anthropogenic contaminants. For public health and planning purposes, the locations of high density of private domestic well (PDW) use need to be determined. A key resource is the 1990 U.S. Census where the source of water was a survey question, which led to a nationwide estimate of PDW usage. In this paper, methods are developed to estimate the areal density of PDW use in later years using readily accessible data including the 1990 census results. Because of abundant data on PDW locations and public water supplies, Oklahoma was used for a pilot project. Well logs reported to the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the addition of housing units provide the means to update the 1990 census estimates. Census results and housing unit data are available on the county, census tract, and census block group level. PWD density estimates were consistent among these scales, as were estimates based on wells added and net housing units. The completeness of reported well logs was tested by counts from neighborhoods with known reliance on PDWs. The results showed that a significant undercounting of logs exists, and the small scale of subdivisions relative to even census block groups causes the method estimates to be lower than subdivision PDW densities. The estimates, however, indicate locations where high densities of PDWs are expected.

Human rights to water and Self-Supply – Potential and challenges RWSN webinar on 24th November 2015 – Key messages and generic findings

Downloads: 40


Author: Olschewski
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: Skat

Summary of generic messages:
1. The Human Right to water does not favour or exclude any management model for provision of safe water to all. The important objective is that eventually all people have universal access, that core principles are adhered to and that there is no difference in quality and access no matter which supply approach is used.
2. Self-supply is aligned and compatible with the concept of progressive realisation of the Human Right to Water.
3. Government’s role in Self-supply is to identify where and when Self-supply is an appropriate option to provide access to safe water. Additionally government should provide technical support, monitoring, financial support (e.g. subsidies), establish an enabling environment and recognize Self-supply as one viable option to achieving the Human Right to Water.
4. In Self-supply, like in other approaches, challenges might occur around affordability, water quality, monitoring, and long term sustainability. The Government must support people moving up the water ladder but also take preventive measures to avoid negative impacts from Self-supply.
5. To further scale up Self-supply subsidies might be an adequate means to allow poor people to move up the water ladder in incremental steps. Subsidies need to be designed and provided in a smart way, without distortion of the local economy. If subsidies are provided there is need to find sustainable funding sources.
6. As Self-supply will not be an option in all regions, and because the cost of using the community managed approach alone will be far too high, a blended approach using boreholes, piped schemes and Self-supply sources (using different technologies) might be the best way to go for achieving universal access in rural areas.

Self-Supply as a means of bringing water to the people of Zimbabwe and its relation to the hand pump program.

Downloads: 21


Author: Morgan, P.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Aquamor Pvt. Ltd.
Institution:

The concept of “self-supply” as a means of providing water to families (who become responsible for their own supply) is becoming increasingly common in Zimbabwe. However there is nothing new in it. For well over half a century, thousands of families living in the rural areas of Zimbabwe had dug their own wells as a means of providing water for domestic and agricultural use. And many families have built tanks to catch rainwater. Rain water harvesting is another method which could fall under the concept of self-supply. A communal hand pump water supply program to support communities living in the rural areas had also begun in the 1930’s when the Bush Pump, then known as the Murgatroyd pump, after its inventor, first began to provide water in Matabeleland. The hand pump supply, supported by the governments Department of Water, subsequently spread throughout the country. In later years the on site management of the Hand Pump programme was and is managed by the District Development Fund. For the cities and towns, water is supplied through municipal piped water supplies, largely supplied from dams and reservoirs. However many people living in the urban areas also used their own wells and boreholes excavated on their own property. And self-supply in the cities is now becoming common.

Water Well Guidelines for use in Developing Countries

Downloads: 1629


Author: SCHNEIDER, S. J.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher:
Institution:

These guidelines are considered minimum requirements for basic protection of the groundwater resource and for the health and safety of those that develop and use the resource. These guidelines are intended to address basic water supply well construction, pumping equipment, and maintenance issues. Water supply wells include wells designed for domestic, municipal, community, industrial, commercial, irrigation and/or livestock water supply use in addition to aquifer storage (injection) and recovery wells.

Multiple Use Water Services - Potential and Challenges for Rural Dwellers (English/Francais/Espanol). E-Discussion on Multiple use water services, 28th of April – 24th of May 2014.

Downloads: 574


Author: MUS Group/RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Multiple Use Water Services - Potential and Challenges for Rural Dwellers.
E-Discussion on Multiple use water services, 28th of April – 24th of May 2014.

Service d’eau à usage multiple - Potentiel et défis pour les habitants en milieu rural.
Discussion en ligne sur les services d’eau à usage multiple, le 28 Avril – 24 Mai 2014.

Servicios de uso múltiple del agua - El potencial y los desafíos para su adopción en áreas rurales
Discusión electrónica sobre los servicios de uso múltiple del agua, del 28 de abril al 24 de mayo de 2014

https://dgroups.org/RWSN/selfsupply/mus/join

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