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A Decade of WPM RWSN: Mapping and Monitoring

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Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

The first webinar reviewed the development of WPM over the past decade, focusing on Malawi, the first country in which the practice was introduced. The key presenters provided dual perspectives of NGO and government actors, which demonstrated the varied methodologies for reporting water supply data, the extent to which data monitoring has impacted decision making and its role in extending equitable and sustainable service delivery. Presentations and discussion assessed the practice, policy, tools and technologies of monitoring and WPM, following its evolution and bringing to question whether WPM is currently a practical and sustainable solution given the reality of resources and government capacities.

Failure and the Future Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

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Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

The fourth and final webinar in the RWSN Water Point Mapping series provided a candid account of the challenges with WPM that have led to failed objectives. There are, however, valuable lessons to be learned from those failures, and the experiences have provided useful models and contributed to improved knowledge and data banks. The webinar also discussed the future of WPM, including new models and initiatives to maximize the benefit of data monitoring and improve information accessibility and transparency.

District Monitoring Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

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Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This second webinar visited case studies of district monitoring experiences in Ethiopia, Bolivia and Ghana to review the methods, costs, challenges and lessons to be learned from each experience.

National Monitoring Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

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Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This third webinar in the series explores the latest state-of-play in national level monitoring of rural water supply, which presentations also of country-led monitoring systems. In these systems, information is collected, analysed and used to inform decentralized resource allocation. Case studies of national monitoring models were reviewed to understand the approaches used in embedding the systems and processes required for maintaining accurate and timely rural water supply information. These case studies also demonstrate the impact monitoring has had on extending equitable and sustainable service delivery and provide key learning points.

Human rights to water and Self-Supply – Potential and challenges RWSN webinar on 24th November 2015 – Key messages and generic findings

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Author: Olschewski
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: Skat

Summary of generic messages:
1. The Human Right to water does not favour or exclude any management model for provision of safe water to all. The important objective is that eventually all people have universal access, that core principles are adhered to and that there is no difference in quality and access no matter which supply approach is used.
2. Self-supply is aligned and compatible with the concept of progressive realisation of the Human Right to Water.
3. Government’s role in Self-supply is to identify where and when Self-supply is an appropriate option to provide access to safe water. Additionally government should provide technical support, monitoring, financial support (e.g. subsidies), establish an enabling environment and recognize Self-supply as one viable option to achieving the Human Right to Water.
4. In Self-supply, like in other approaches, challenges might occur around affordability, water quality, monitoring, and long term sustainability. The Government must support people moving up the water ladder but also take preventive measures to avoid negative impacts from Self-supply.
5. To further scale up Self-supply subsidies might be an adequate means to allow poor people to move up the water ladder in incremental steps. Subsidies need to be designed and provided in a smart way, without distortion of the local economy. If subsidies are provided there is need to find sustainable funding sources.
6. As Self-supply will not be an option in all regions, and because the cost of using the community managed approach alone will be far too high, a blended approach using boreholes, piped schemes and Self-supply sources (using different technologies) might be the best way to go for achieving universal access in rural areas.

Sustainability of Rainwater Harvesting System for the Domestic Needs (A Case Study of Daugha VDC, Gulmi, Nepal) Master Thesis

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Author: Ramesh Chandra Bohara
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher:
Institution: Pokhara University, Nepal

This study analysis the sustainability of a Domestic Rainwater Harvesting (DRWH) intervention in rural Nepal, which started in 1996. It looks at issues like long-term functionality and impact of the intervention, summarizing the findings in four key sustainability dimenstions: technical, socio-environmental, institutional, and economic. The study concludes that RWH enjoys high technical and socio-environmental acceptance, but that the institutional and cost-recovery dimensions are weaker, leading to an overall estimate of "sustainable but at risk" for the VDC at hand.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Sustainability of Rainwater Harvesting System for the Domestic Needs (A Case Study of Daugha VDC, Gulmi, Nepal) Summary Presentation

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Author: Ramesh Chandra Bohara
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher:
Institution: Pokhara University, Nepal

This presentation summarizes the MSc thesis on the same subject (Sustainability of Rainwater Harvesting Systems for the Domestic Needs: A Case Study of Daugha VDC, Gulmi, Nepal).

The full thesis can be found here: http://www.rural-water-supply.net/en/resources/details/749

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Self-Supply as a means of bringing water to the people of Zimbabwe and its relation to the hand pump program.

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Author: Morgan, P.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Aquamor Pvt. Ltd.
Institution:

The concept of “self-supply” as a means of providing water to families (who become responsible for their own supply) is becoming increasingly common in Zimbabwe. However there is nothing new in it. For well over half a century, thousands of families living in the rural areas of Zimbabwe had dug their own wells as a means of providing water for domestic and agricultural use. And many families have built tanks to catch rainwater. Rain water harvesting is another method which could fall under the concept of self-supply. A communal hand pump water supply program to support communities living in the rural areas had also begun in the 1930’s when the Bush Pump, then known as the Murgatroyd pump, after its inventor, first began to provide water in Matabeleland. The hand pump supply, supported by the governments Department of Water, subsequently spread throughout the country. In later years the on site management of the Hand Pump programme was and is managed by the District Development Fund. For the cities and towns, water is supplied through municipal piped water supplies, largely supplied from dams and reservoirs. However many people living in the urban areas also used their own wells and boreholes excavated on their own property. And self-supply in the cities is now becoming common.

Strengthening the Domestic Drilling Industry Lessons from the Mozambique

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Author: World Bank
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher:
Institution: WSP

Improving water supply in rural areas of Mozambique continues to be a major challenge. The highly dispersed rural population and difficult hydrogeology make even the most basic level of service--a borehole with a hand pump—accessible to only about half of the rural population. Even when basic access is available, 17.1 percent
of hand pumps are out of service at any one time, rising to nearly 30 percent in the Northern provinces.

With the support of the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), water drillers in Mozambique began tackling this challenge through the creation of the Mozambique Drilling Association (APM). As the first of its kind, the association introduced several key initiatives to boost the capacity of drillers and to strengthen their voice to the government. The purpose of this learning note is to share lessons learned from WSP’s support to APM and to highlight additional areas of growth and development for the association.

Costing and Pricing - A Guide for Water Well Drilling Enterprises RWSN Publication 2014-12

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Author: DANERT, K., LUUTU, A., CARTER, R., & OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This field note is written for water well drilling enterprises as well as other agencies which manage, or are involved in drilling projects. Using a step-by-step approach it gives clear guidance on how to cost and price the construction of drilled water wells. It also provides tips on business management with an emphasis of the realities faced in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Once you are familiar with this field note, you will be in a much stronger position to calculate drilling costs, consider prices and deal with business realities.

Siting of Drilled Water Wells - A Guide for Project Managers RWSN Publication 2014-11

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Author: CARTER, R., CHILTON, J., DANERT, K. & OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This field note has been written for managers of water supply programmes and projects. It provides a step by step guide on the siting of drilled water wells. As a first step, the essential requirements for a simple groundwater model are set out, including some basic explanations to help the reader establish a sound understanding of hydrogeology.

Sustainable Groundwater Development: use, protect and enhance RWSN Publication 2014-9

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Author: FUREY S. G. & DANERT K.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: Skat, SDC, UNICEF, DFID, DEW Point

This RWSN publication is to help create a better understanding of the crucial importance of groundwater and to highlight the risk to its sustainability. It is intended for politicians, policy makers, government partners and the public. It advocates responsible groundwater use and cautions against abuse. It encourages users of groundwater to protect and enhance this precious resource for the long term benefit of the most vulnerable communities who primarily use hand pumps.

Supervising Water Well Drilling A guide for supervisors

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Author: ADEKILE, D.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution: RWSN/UNICEF

Good supervision of water well drilling is essential for the provision of long-lasting water wells. This guidance note assists geologists and engineers in charge of the supervision of borehole construction as well as project managers. It can be used to prepare for training, and as a manual.
This guide details the responsibilities of the drilling supervisor at the different stages of borehole construction. It explains the actions to be carried out at each stage that will ensure that the driller delivers the borehole as specified in the contract.

Water Well Guidelines for use in Developing Countries

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Author: SCHNEIDER, S. J.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher:
Institution:

These guidelines are considered minimum requirements for basic protection of the groundwater resource and for the health and safety of those that develop and use the resource. These guidelines are intended to address basic water supply well construction, pumping equipment, and maintenance issues. Water supply wells include wells designed for domestic, municipal, community, industrial, commercial, irrigation and/or livestock water supply use in addition to aquifer storage (injection) and recovery wells.

المقررة الخاصة للأمم المتحدة المعنية بحق الإنسان في الحصول على مياه الشرب المأمونة وخدمات الصرف الصح

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Author: DE ALBUQUERQUE, C.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: UN Special Rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation
Institution: UN Special Rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation

This Handbook is the product of six years of work by the first UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights to water and sanitation. It explains the meaning and legal obligations that arise from these rights, translating the often complex technical and legal language into accessible information.

This Handbook clarifies the meaning of the human rights to water and sanitation, explains the obligations that arise from these rights and provides guidance on implementing the human rights to water and sanitation. It also shares some examples of good practice, shows how these rights are being implemented and explores how States can be held to account for delivering on their obligations. Finally, the handbook provides a series of checklists, so that readers can assess how far they are complying with the human rights to water and sanitation.

The Handbook is primarily for governments at all levels, donors and national regulatory bodies. It provides information that will also be useful to other local, regional and international stakeholders, including civil society, service providers and human rights organisations.

The Handbook is presented in nine booklets, each of which addresses a particular area of activity:
1: Introduction
2: Frameworks (Legislative, regulatory and policy frameworks)
3: Financing (Financing, budgeting and budget-tracking)
4: Services (Planning processes, service providers, service levels and settlements)
5: Monitoring
6: Justice (Access to justice)
7: Principles (Non-discrimination, equality, information, participation, sustainability)
8: Checklists
9: Sources (Glossary, Bibliography, Index)

Booklets 2-7 contain checklists for the State and other actors to assess whether the State is complying with the requirements of the human rights to water and sanitation.

Procurement and Contract Management of Drilled Well Construction A Guide for Supervisors and Project Managers

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Author: ADEKILE, D
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: RWSN

The high rate of non-functional boreholes in many parts of the world is attributable, in part, to a lack of professionalism in the drilling sector. In order to increase access to a safe and sustainable water supply, competent and experienced drilling contractors must be engaged. Likewise, suitable equipment is needed and experienced consultants are required to supervise construction.
This guidance note assists project managers involved in the provision of groundwater supplies using boreholes. It sets out procurement and contract management procedures that will lead to the engagement of professional groundwater consultants, drilling contractors and suppliers. The publication will enable clients to ensure that they have the know-how to get the expected results out of drilling contracts.

TAF (Step 2): Sanitation - New - General Assessment Indicator Sheet

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Author: OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: WASHTech Project
Institution:

This package of 18 scoring sheets allows the user group to assess the applicability of any sanitation or hygiene technology in a particular context.

These are situated to situations where you want to evaluate the successes, failures, opportunities and barriers for existing sanitation or hygiene technology.

TAF (Step 2): Water - New - General Assessment Indicator Sheet

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Author: OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: WASHTech Project
Institution:

This package of 18 scoring sheets allows the user group to assess the applicability of any Water Supply technology in a in a context where it has already been introduced.

These are situated to situations where you want to evaluate the successes, failures, opportunities and barriers for new water supply technology.

Webinar Series 2014 (UNICEF- RWSN) on Manual Drilling/Webinaires sur le sujet de Forage Manuel Five Interactive webinars, which aim to promote South-South sharing. Une séries de cinq (5) Webinaires sur le sujet de Forage Manuel.

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Author: DANERT K
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: UNICEF/RWSN
Institution: UNICEF/RWSN

Manual Drilling has now been successfully implemented in many countries, with several taking it to scale. The webinars will provide participants with an opportunity to learn from the successes and challenges experienced from different organisations and trigger discussion, with time for questions and exchange of perspectives.
Webinars are in both French and English, with corresponding summaries also being made available in both languages.

Le but est de partager vos expériences et contribuer au débat dans la région Sud
Beaucoup de pays ont achevé de succès dans leur entretien du programme de forage manuel. Plusieurs de ces pays maintenant mettent à l’échelle le programme. Les sessions auront deux parties. Dans la première partie, vous apprendrez des succès et des difficultés dont UNICEF et ses partenaires font face à en ménageant un programme de forage manuel. Dans la deuxième partie, vous êtes invitez à poser des questions et faire des commentaires. Les sessions sont en Anglais et en Français; aussi que les matériaux des présentations et des discussions.

The Blair Pump An update

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Author: MORGAN, P.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher:
Institution: Aquamor

The Blair Pump is a simple direct action shallow well hand pump. It was first designed in 1976 and developed further at the Blair Research Laboratory in Harare, (formerly Salisbury). The earlier models were heavy duty using 90mm PVC pipe as a cylinder. The maximum lift of these earlier models was 6m. Later in the early 1980’s a lighter duty model was designed at the laboratory for family use. Like the earlier model it was built with “off the shelf” fittings, which could put together by an artisan or in the home. This later model used 40mm PVC as a cylinder. The maximum pipe length for these later models was 12m. A description of its construction was introduced in to the school curriculum at the time. A mass produced version was also manufactured in Zimbabwe in the early 1980’s, using 50mm PVC pipe as a cylinder. These various models were described in detail in Rural Water Supplies and Sanitation.

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