RWSN Ressources: utiliser les filtres sur la droite pour affiner votre rechercheh

Total des résultats: 602 • Page 17 sur 31

Trier les résultats par:

Author Year Downloads Title

Improving Equity of Service Delivery through Water Kiosk Mapping in Low Income Areas in Lilongwe, Malawi

Downloads:


Author: Meke M.
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher:
Institution: WaterAid

Water & Sanitation Sub-Sector Performance Measurment Process in Uganda

Downloads:


Author: Arebahona I.
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher:
Institution:

Case Study in Venkatapuram, Khammam District, India

Downloads:


Author: Vinnapanssa
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher:
Institution:

Service delivery indicators and monitoring to improve sustainability of rural water supplies in Ghana

Downloads:


Author: Adank, M., Le Gouais, A., Lockwood, H., Dzansi, P.
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher:
Institution:

Current approaches to monitoring rural water supplies focus primarily on coverage measured in terms of numbers of systems built and people served. Such approaches do not normally take into account the fact that, without proper support for operations and planning for maintenance and replacement, systems break down and services deteriorate. Recent studies suggest that around a third of water facilities in sub-Saharan Africa are not functioning at all or are performing well below their design standard. This paper draws on the monitoring work in Ghana by the Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) and Triple-S, showing how monitoring systems can be used to track service levels over time, as well as the key technical, financial and management functions of service providers or operators and the oversight and support functions of service authorities (often local or district government), so that problems can be anticipated and addressed.

Liberia Waterpoint Atlas

Downloads:


Author:
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher:
Institution:

Quality Assurance of Unicef Drilling Programes for Boreholes in Malawi Consultancy Services

Downloads:


Author: Anscombe J.R.
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher: Ministry of Agriculture Irrigation and Water Development Malawi
Institution: unicef

This review was commissioned by UNICEF to snapshot the current effectiveness of procurement and field processes related to the drilling, the role of the district councils in these implementation processes and indeed the quality of the finished water point products. This with an objective of identifying weaknesses and remedying them in future programmes.

Mitos no Sector de Abastecimento de Água Rural Perspectiva No 4

Downloads:


Author: Comité Executivo de Direcção da RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Um dos maiores desafios deste sector é de assegurar que os habitantes das zonas rurais, a nível mundial, não têm de caminhar várias horas para ir à procura d água potável, em quantidade suficiente. Este documento coloca questões, às partes envolvidas, na tentativa de melhorar o fornecimento de água rural, quer seja doador, governo, ONG, gestor de programa ou especialista. Este documento examina criticamente as nossas modestas realizações, alista as áreas onde as nossas abordagens necessitam de ser substancialmente melhoradas e identifica alguns desafios.

Code of Practice for Cost Effective Boreholes British English Version, June 2010

Downloads:


Author: DANERT, K., ARMSTRONG, T., ADEKILE, D., DUFFAU, B., OUEDRAOGO, I. & KWEI, C.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Sustainable groundwater development is fundamental in order to provide universal access to safe drinking water. This document, The Code of Practice for Cost Effective Boreholes provides a basis for the realisation of economical and sustainable access to safe water. The term “cost-effective” means optimum value for money invested over the long term. Boreholes are drilled to function for a lifespan of 20 to 50 years. Thus, the lowest cost is not always the most cost-effective, particularly if construction quality is compromised to save money. Cheap drilling or poor construction quality can lead to premature failure of the well or contamination of the water supply. Boreholes that are subsequently abandoned by the users are clearly not cost-effective.

The Code of Practice for Cost-Effective Boreholes has been officially endorsed by the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR).

Assessment of Groundwater Investigations and Borehole Drilling Capacity in Uganda

Downloads:


Author: SLOOTS, R.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: UNICEF
Institution: Ministry of Water and Environment, Republic of Uganda

The report describes the legislative and institutional framework of the sector. The Directorate of Water Resources Management regulates the water drilling in Uganda. The Directorate licenses the drilling contractors and issues permits for drilling and water abstraction, and collects data for the national groundwater database.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Myths of the Rural Water Supply Sector RWSN Perspective No 4

Downloads:


Author: RWSN Executive Steering Committee
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Ensuring that rural dwellers around the world do not have to walk for hours to collect sufficient and safe drinking water is a huge challenge. This short article raises issues for those of us who are involved in trying to improve rural water supplies, whether as donor, Government or NGO; program manager or practitioner. It takes a hard look at our limited achievements, points to areas where our approaches need to be radically improved and sets some challenges.

This paper was prepared by the Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN) Executive Steering Committee. It drew heavily on background papers prepared by Kerstin Danert and Peter Harvey and comments from Richard Carter, as well as the knowledge and experiences from all of the Executive Steering Committee members. The process involved a workshop in September 2008 which agreed the main issues that would be covered by the paper. Barbara Evans produced the first draft of the paper and helped facilitate and document the workshop process. This was followed by an extensive review process in order to reach consensus.

WASH Technology Information Packages for UNICEF WASH Programme and Supply Personnel

Downloads:


Author: BAUMANN, E., MONTANGERO, A., SUTTON, S. and K. ERPF
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: UNICEF
Institution: Skat

The Technology Information Packages (TIPS) provide technology selection guidelines for UNICEF WASH programme officers and partner organisations, enabling them to better help communities make informed choices about water and sanitation technology.

Accelerating Self Supply - A Case Study from Ethiopia RWSN Field Note 2010-2

Downloads:


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

With 40 million or more rural people without access to safe wa-ter, Ethiopia is faced with a major challenge to reach the Universal Access Plan targets (98% coverage by 2012) or even the MDG target (52% coverage by 2015). At the same time there have already been mass campaigns to encourage household investment in rainwater harvesting for irrigation and well-digging. As a result, the government is keen to adopt the con-cepts of low-cost solutions and Self Supply and is exploring the best ways to do so.

Accelerating Self Supply - A Case Study from Mali RWSN Field Note 2010-1

Downloads:


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Self Supply is an approach whereby households are supported to make their own investments in water supplies. Mali is one of four countries considering the adoption of Self Supply into its rural water supply strategy. This follows moves by the Rural Wa-ter Supply Network (RWSN) to highlight the potential that household investment may have as an option for increasing the rate of water supply improvements in a country with over 200,000 unlined traditional wells. This represents one for every five households. Initially it is the health sector taking the initia-tive, as they recognise the numbers of people using these wells and the potential impact of progressive health risk reduction. Protection from contamination is accompanied by promotion of the productive use of water to repay investment. This paper documents progress in relation to Self Supply approaches in Mali and identifies some of the issues which may influence strategy or which need resolving.

Accelerating Self Supply - A Case Study from Zambia RWSN Field Note 2010-3

Downloads:


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Zambia has a very low density rural population, which makes the establishment of sustainable community water supplies a particular challenge. Previous piloting of improvements to traditional water sources showed both a demand for and an impact from low cost up-grading (Sutton 2002). UNICEF, with RWSN technical support, has been encouraging improvements to water supplies in some of the poorest districts of Luapula Province. Remarkably, these have been achieved with zero subsidy. All hardware costs (labour and materials) are covered by householders; the donor input being only in capacity building through training and marketing.

This document presents progress of the work to accelerate Self Supply in Zambia from 2007 to the end of 2009.

Accelerating Self Supply - A Case Study from Uganda RWSN Field Note 2010-4

Downloads:


Author: DANERT, K. and S. SUTTON
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

The Ministry of Water and Environment and numerous Non-Government Organisations in Uganda have several years of experience in the promotion of rainwater harvesting for domestic use as well as the piloting of household-led improvements to hand-dug wells. It is becoming clear that many households are able and willing to invest in making improvements to their own water supplies. RWSN has just published a field note which documents the story of promoting such investments in Uganda from the late 1990s to 2010 and sets key issues as the country develops a Guiding Framework for Accelerating Access to Safe and Reliable Water through Self Supply in Uganda. These issues include the development of clear guidelines, training of the private sector, and links to planning and financial mechanisms.

Report on the Ministry of Water and Environment and UNICEF officials' study tour to Zambia, Self-Supply Initiatives

Downloads:


Author: MWE
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: UNICEF
Institution:

A team of six from the Ministry of Water and Environment and UNICEF visited Zambia to learn more about self supply initiative and gain lessons for possible replication in Uganda.
While in Zambia, the team collected and analysed information on how the Government of the Republic of Zambia (GRZ) supports self-supply initiatives especially in areas of advocacy, communication, technical support to communities, technology in self supply, private sector promotion, demonstration and financing mechanisms. The team had a pre-field visit briefing and discussions with the Permanent Secretary and Director and staff of the Ministry of Local Government and Housing (MoLGH) – the ministry responsible for rural water supplies, the implementing partners – WaterAid and Development Aid from People to People (DAPP) and United Nations Childrens Education Fund (UNICEF) Lusaka. The team then visited Luapula Province where self-supply is being implemented. The team visited 4 project sites and had discussions with communities and water source owners. At the end of the visit, the team had a debriefing meeting with the MoLGH to provide feedback on the experiences of entire visit. The study report presents key findings and the recommendations for Uganda.

Synthesis Report (2010): Code of Practice for Cost-Effective Boreholes

Downloads:


Author: Kerstin Danert
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution: Skat Foundation

This report provides a synthesis of the findings of field work undertaken in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Zambia in relation to the principles set out in the Generic Code of Practice. A recommended report structure for subsequent studies to examine the cost-effectiveness of borehole drilling in other countries is provided.

INVENTAIRE EN LIGNE DES POINTS D’ACCES A L’EAU POTABLE ET A L’ASSAINISSEMENT DU PEPAM/BAD1 REGIONS DE LOUGA, KOLDA ET ZIGUINCHOR UNIQUEMENT POUR DISTRIBUTION INTERNE

Downloads:


Author: Daniel Annerose
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher:
Institution: PEPAM

L’objectif sectoriel du Sous-programme PEPAM – BAD 1 est de contribuer à l’amélioration
des conditions socioéconomiques et sanitaires des populations rurales. Ses objectifs
spécifiques sont:
(i) d’améliorer la desserte en services d’eau potable et d’assainissement familial,
dans 240 localités rurales des 3 régions (Louga, Ziguinchor et Kolda);
(ii) d’améliorer la desserte en services d’assainissement collectif dans 60 des 114 communautés rurales des 3 régions.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Implementation Guidelines for Rural Water Supply and Sanitation

Downloads:


Author: MIWD
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: Government of the Republic of Malawi
Institution: Ministry of Irrigation and Water Development

These implementation guidelines have been developed to harmonise and standardise approaches for carrying out water supply and sanitation services. The guidelines highlight the principles and best practices for carrying out water supply and sanitation activities to ensure sustainability of the services.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

The Zimbabwe Bush Pump Inspection of the “B” type Bush Pump Part 2. “Down the hole” components Inspection Manual

Downloads:


Author: MORGAN, P.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: Aquamor Pvt Ltd
Institution:

This manual gives detailed quality control and inspection guidance on the down the hole components for a Zimbabwe "B" type Bush Pump.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31