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Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Handbook for Extension Workers, Vol. 2

This Handbook is intended for the use by extension staff and workers of local government and other development actors, such as NGOs and CBOs, providing services in communities. An extension staff can be broadly defined as a person responsible for dissemination of new approaches and technologies, developing effective and efficient management systems, and community mobilisation. Extension workers link the community to the technical team at higher level to provide specific technical input.

The main purpose of this handbook is to enable extension workers or agents to facilitate communities in the selection of the water and sanitation services they need to ensure these services are properly operated, maintained, and sustained by the communities. | »

Handbook on rainwater harvesting storage options

This handbook is intended to be a practical reference guide on rainwater harvesting storage options for technical personnel, skilled masons and social workers involved in promoting the collection of rainwater at household, community and institutional levels. | »

Harnessing water point data to improve drinking water services

This document introduces what water point data are, why they are collected, and how they are used in “The Value of Water Point Data”. The chapter “A Deep Dive: The Case of Uganda” illustrates the use and progressive improvement of water point data in a country that is actively updating and publishing its National Water Atlas.

“From Water Point Data to Improved Water Services” provides an overview of how water point data can be used more effectively to measure services and water resources, strengthen the enabling environment, and improve coordination. It also reviews some innovative approaches under development, such as the remote monitoring of water points. Finally, “Recommendations” provides actionable guidance to a) national governments, b) local governments, c) NGOs and implementers, and d) donors and investors. | »

What’s Working, Where, and for How Long A 2016 Water Point Update to the RWSN (2009) statistics

• An average of 78% of water points are functional across the 11 countries analyzed.

• The high failure rates early after installation are troubling: almost 15% after one year and 25% of water points are non-functional by their fourth year after installation. This indicates widespread problems with poor quality water point installation, due to a range of problems that may include professionalism and skills around contracts, construction and supervision; borehole siting; lack of quality control of hardware; or lack of post-construction monitoring and problem resolution.

• Handpumps are often singled out as technology that fails, but analysis of other water point types show similar functionality levels, and that tens of thousands of handpumps are providing a service

This poster was peer-reviewed and presented at the 7th RWSN Forum in Abidjan, Cote'Ivoire 2016.

It replaces "Handpump Data 2009 Selected Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa" (2009) | »

Assessing the Risk to Groundwater from On-Site Sanitation Guidelines for

There has been encouraging progress with access to safe drinking water and sanitation in both rural and urban areas since the United Nations Water Decade of the 1980s. However, more than 1 billion people around the world still lack access to safe water supplies and more than 2.4 billion are without adequate sanitation. A substantial majority of these people live in Asia where the lack of sanitation provision is particularly acute. In Africa, over one third of the population still remains without access to safe water and sanitation, and many of these can only be served by groundwater. The need for renewed efforts to improve the situation is recognised in DFID's recently published water strategy paper - ''Addressing the Water Crisis - Healthier and More Productive Lives for Poor People''.

These guidelines are an important contribution to risk assessment and the avoidance of the contamination of groundwater supplies from on-site sanitation. They have been development as part of a project funded by DFID through the water component of the Infrastructure and Urban Development Division's Knowledge and Research Programme. | »

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