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Effective Joint Sector Reviews for Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) A Study and Guidance - 2016

This is the first consolidated and referenced multicountry study of Water or Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Joint Sector Reviews (JSRs). The study report and associated Learning Note and Poster provide an understanding of JSR processes and practical guidance on how to introduce and improve them. The study sets out a methodology in the form of visual checklists to reflect and take stock of WASH JSR processes. This could also form the foundation for subsequent cross-country comparisons of the JSR process.

The publications provide an analysis of JSRs as well as practical guidance on how to introduce and effectively manage them. The initial focus of the work was on JSRs in fragile states. However, the contested definitions of a fragile state, arbitrary thresholds as well as the realization that there are common issues with respect to JSRs in nonfragile countries led to a widening of the scope of countries studied. Notably, all countries included are considerably donor dependant for WASH. The study considered 25 countries, and found that between 2001 and 2015, WASH JSRs had taken place in 19 of them.

Note that these documents are review copies. | »

District Monitoring Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

This second webinar visited case studies of district monitoring experiences in Ethiopia, Bolivia and Ghana to review the methods, costs, challenges and lessons to be learned from each experience. | »

Service delivery indicators and monitoring to improve sustainability of rural water supplies in Ghana

Current approaches to monitoring rural water supplies focus primarily on coverage measured in terms of numbers of systems built and people served. Such approaches do not normally take into account the fact that, without proper support for operations and planning for maintenance and replacement, systems break down and services deteriorate. Recent studies suggest that around a third of water facilities in sub-Saharan Africa are not functioning at all or are performing well below their design standard. This paper draws on the monitoring work in Ghana by the Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) and Triple-S, showing how monitoring systems can be used to track service levels over time, as well as the key technical, financial and management functions of service providers or operators and the oversight and support functions of service authorities (often local or district government), so that problems can be anticipated and addressed. | »

The Technology Applicability Framework. A Participatory Tool to Validate Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Technologies for Low-Income Urban Areas in S. Hostettler et al. (eds.), Technologies for Development,

Decision-makers as well as practitioners in the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) sector are facing serious challenges to keep existing WASH infrastructure in operation or to ensure provision of lasting and adequate WASH services. In many countries there are no tested procedures for assessing sustainability and scalability of new or existing technologies for providing adequate and lasting WASH services in a specific context.

The TAF was field tested on 13 WASH technologies in three countries: Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Uganda. This paper presents the findings from the testing of the TAF and highlights potentials and limits of its applicability
for assessing the sustainable application and scalability of WASH technologies.
Relevant documents on the methodology, the testing as well as case studies and manuals are accessible in the public domain through www.washtechnologies.net. | »

Manual Drilling Compendium 2015 RWSN Publication 2015-2

Manual drilling refers to several drilling methods that rely on human energy to construct a borehole and complete a water supply. The various techniques can be used in areas where formations are quite soft and groundwater is relatively shallow.

Manual drilling can provide safe drinking water. The equipment can easily be transported to remote, or difficult to serve populations which would otherwise be left behind. The lower costs compared to machine drilling are appreciated by households, businesses and governments. Manual drilling also provides local employment.

Manual drilling methods are being used to provide water for drinking and other domestic needs at least 36 countries around the world. In some places, manual drilling methods are well established.

The compendium provides a useful overview for those wishing to further examine the impacts and challenges of manual drilling, and, more importantly, improve practices on the ground. It is hoped that the document will spur others to undertake fur-ther studies as well as research to document stories and analyse the promotion, uptake and use of manually drilled boreholes. In addition, the compendium should also enable those promoting manual drilling to realise that they are certainly not alone in their endeavours! | »

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