RWSN Resources

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5ème Forum RWSN 2006 - Ghana

Downloads: 13


Author: JONES, J. et J. DOYEN
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Amplifier l'Entreprenariat Local en matière d'Approvisionnement en Eua en Milieu Rural pour atteindre les OMDs Compte Rendu en Francais

7th RWSN Forum Report 2016 Rapport du 7ème Forum RWSN 2016

Downloads: 14


Author: Naughton, M.; Furey, S.; Danert, K; Gosling, L.; Greggio, E; Smets, S; Adank, M; Serrano, A; Saladin, M
Year of Publishing: 2017
Publisher:
Institution:

The 2016 Rural Water Supply Network Forum in Abidjan was the first global gathering to consider the practical challenge of how everyone worldwide can get access to safe, affordable water by 2030. It was also the first RWSN Forum to take place in a francophone country, in the 25 years since the creation of the network. The Forum gathered 467 rural water sector practitioners from over 300 organisations from 64 countries in Africa, Asia, Americas, and Europe, in a bilingual (English/French) four day event. It was opened by the Prime Minister of Côte d’Ivoire, Mr Daniel Kaplan Duncan. This report is written to reflect the spirit of sharing knowledge and experience, and provides an overview of the presentations, articles, posters, images and films shared at the event, as well as some of the lessons learnt in organising the event itself. The Forum website (rwsn7.net) remains an archive for all the papers, presentations, posters, films and media coverage received during the Forum, in English and in French.

Le Forum du Rural Water Supply Network 2016 à Abidjan était le premier évènement global à considerer les défis liés à l’approvi-sionnement à une eau potable et abordable pour tous d’ici 2030 d’un point de vue pratique. C’était également le premier à avoir lieu dans un pays francophone depuis la creation du réseau il y a 25 ans.
Le Forum a réuni 467 professionnels du secteur de l’eau rurale de 300 organisations et de 64 pays d’Afrique, Asie, Amérique, et de l’ Europe, pendant 4 jours en deux langues (anglais et français). La cérémonie d’ouverture a été présidée par le Premier minister de Côte d’Ivoire, Mr Daniel Kaplan Duncan. Ce rapport est rédigé pour refléter l’esprit de partage de connaissances et d’expérience, et donne un aperçu des présentations, articles, posters, images et films partagés lors de l'évènement, ainsi que les leçons apprises à travers l'organisation de l'évènement. Le site du Forum (rwsn7.net) reste une archive pour tous les articles, présentations, posters, films et couverture médiatique du Forum, en anglais et en français.

A Brief History of Hand Drilled Wells in Niger Only the beginning

Downloads: 224


Author: DANERT, K.
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution: RWSN

This field note describes the history of hand drilling and water-lifting techniques introduced in Niger over 30 years and now firmly in the hands of local enterprises, farmers and water users. Recommendations for the way forward are included.

A Community Resource Book for the Water and Sanitation Sector

Downloads: 553


Author: DWD
Year of Publishing: 2007
Publisher: Ministry of Water and Environment, Republic of Uganda
Institution: Directorate of Water Development

This Community Resource Book has been prepared to provide communities, and especially any active person or group within communities (e.g. Water User Groups), with good knowledge in matters concerning the planning for, management and maintenance of water supply and sanitation facilities. The Book also provides guidance on how to improve the hygiene and sanitation practices at community and household level. In addition it outlines the roles and responsibilities of the respective communities, its leaders as well as key bodies and institutions that are involved in the process of implementing, rehabilitating and maintaining rural water and sanitation activities.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

A comparative study between “Rope pumps” and conventional piston pumps on water quality and other sustainability parameters Appropriate technologies for rural water supply

Downloads: 100


Author: COLORU, B., S. MGAYA and R. POZZI-TAUBERT
Year of Publishing: 2012
Publisher: Fondazione ACRA-CCS, SHIPO
Institution:

In Tanzania there now are some 5000 Rope pumps both for small communities and Households. To compare Rope pumps with piston pumps like Afridev and Nira pumps regarding water quality, cost per capita and other aspects, the organisation ACRA effected a Comparative study. Some conclusions of the study are:
- Rural communities do not prefer piston pumps above Rope pump
-The water quality of tested Rope pumps is lower than Piston pumps but this is mainly due to bad installation. If installed right there is not much difference in water quality.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

A Hidden Resource: Household-led rural water supply in Ethiopia

Downloads: 97


Author: SUTTON, S., BUTTERWORTH, J. and MEKONTA, L.
Year of Publishing: 2012
Publisher: IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre
Institution:

This report brings together the findings of two complementary research studies on the role of Self Supply in rural water services provision in different regions of Ethiopia. Self Supply involves households taking the lead in their own development, including investment in the construction, upgrading and maintenance of their own water sources, lifting devices and storage facilities. Traditional wells, which are usually family-owned, are the most common type of source and are the focus of this report. Various types of lifting device are used, starting from a rope and bucket. Rope pumps are being promoted as a step ahead, and in some specific areas, diesel or electric pumps are common. Until now, there has been relatively little information available about the performance of family or traditional wells, with water quality studies, for example the Rapid Assessment of Drinking Water Quality, RADWQ (WHO/ UNICEF, 2010), tending to focus on community sources such as handpumps.

A preliminary study of training artisans in upgradeable techniques for family owned wells

Downloads: 76


Author: MORGAN, P. and A. KANYEMBA
Year of Publishing: 2012
Publisher: Aquamor Pvt Ltd
Institution:

Several years ago Zimbabwe embarked on a program of upgrading family owned wells. This program was fully endorsed by the GOZ and operated under the MOHCW. The program has been well documented in papers and other publications. This program was based on the fact that for many decades individual families had chosen to upgrade their own wells privately and outside the formal GOZ rural water supply and sanitation program.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Accelerating Self Supply - A Case Study from Ethiopia RWSN Field Note 2010-2

Downloads: 122


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

With 40 million or more rural people without access to safe wa-ter, Ethiopia is faced with a major challenge to reach the Universal Access Plan targets (98% coverage by 2012) or even the MDG target (52% coverage by 2015). At the same time there have already been mass campaigns to encourage household investment in rainwater harvesting for irrigation and well-digging. As a result, the government is keen to adopt the con-cepts of low-cost solutions and Self Supply and is exploring the best ways to do so.

Accelerating Self Supply - A Case Study from Mali RWSN Field Note 2010-1

Downloads: 68


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Self Supply is an approach whereby households are supported to make their own investments in water supplies. Mali is one of four countries considering the adoption of Self Supply into its rural water supply strategy. This follows moves by the Rural Wa-ter Supply Network (RWSN) to highlight the potential that household investment may have as an option for increasing the rate of water supply improvements in a country with over 200,000 unlined traditional wells. This represents one for every five households. Initially it is the health sector taking the initia-tive, as they recognise the numbers of people using these wells and the potential impact of progressive health risk reduction. Protection from contamination is accompanied by promotion of the productive use of water to repay investment. This paper documents progress in relation to Self Supply approaches in Mali and identifies some of the issues which may influence strategy or which need resolving.

Accelerating Self Supply - A Case Study from Uganda RWSN Field Note 2010-4

Downloads: 92


Author: DANERT, K. and S. SUTTON
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

The Ministry of Water and Environment and numerous Non-Government Organisations in Uganda have several years of experience in the promotion of rainwater harvesting for domestic use as well as the piloting of household-led improvements to hand-dug wells. It is becoming clear that many households are able and willing to invest in making improvements to their own water supplies. RWSN has just published a field note which documents the story of promoting such investments in Uganda from the late 1990s to 2010 and sets key issues as the country develops a Guiding Framework for Accelerating Access to Safe and Reliable Water through Self Supply in Uganda. These issues include the development of clear guidelines, training of the private sector, and links to planning and financial mechanisms.

Accelerating Self Supply - A Case Study from Zambia RWSN Field Note 2010-3

Downloads: 88


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2010
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Zambia has a very low density rural population, which makes the establishment of sustainable community water supplies a particular challenge. Previous piloting of improvements to traditional water sources showed both a demand for and an impact from low cost up-grading (Sutton 2002). UNICEF, with RWSN technical support, has been encouraging improvements to water supplies in some of the poorest districts of Luapula Province. Remarkably, these have been achieved with zero subsidy. All hardware costs (labour and materials) are covered by householders; the donor input being only in capacity building through training and marketing.

This document presents progress of the work to accelerate Self Supply in Zambia from 2007 to the end of 2009.

Accelerating Self Supply - Summary of progress in introducing a new approach RWSN Field Note 2011-2

Downloads: 108


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

The Ministry of Water and Environment as well as numerous Non-Government Organisations in Uganda have several years of experience in the promotion of rainwater harvesting for domestic use as well as the piloting of household-led improvements to hand-dug wells. It is becoming clear that many households are able and willing to invest in making improvements to their own water supplies. This field note documents the story of promoting such investments in Uganda from the late 1990s to 2010 and sets out a number of key issues that need to be considered as the country develops a Guiding Framework for Accelerating Access to Safe and Reliable Water through Self Supply in Uganda. These issues include the development of clear guidelines, training of the private sector, and links to planning and financial mechanisms.

Accélérer l’auto-approvisionnement Une étude de cas de l’Ouganda 2010 RWSN Field Note 2010-5

Downloads: 17


Author: Danert K. and S. Sutton
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

En Ouganda, le Ministère de l’Eau et de l’Environnement, ainsi que de nombreuses ONG, ont plusieurs années d’expérience dans la promotion de la collecte d’eau de pluie pour usage do-mestique et dans le pilotage de projets d’amélioration par les ménages de puits creusés à la main. Il apparaît que de nom-breux ménages sont capables et désireux d’investir dans l’amélioration de leur système d’approvisionnement en eau. Cette note de terrain explique comment ces investissements ont été encouragés entre la fin des années 1990 et 2010, et expose quelques enjeux principaux, alors que le pays élabore un Plan d’orientation pour accélérer l’accès fiable à de l’eau potable par l’auto-approvisionnement en Ouganda. Ces enjeux comprennent l’élaboration de directives claires, la formation du secteur privé et la mise en relation avec des mécanismes de financement et de planification.

Accélérer l’auto-approvisionnement: Résumé des progrès accomplis dans l’introduction d’une nouvelle approche RWSN Field Note 2011-6

Downloads: 28


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Cela devient évident que les capacités des ménages, leurs priorités, et la force que confère la propriété effective constituent déjà,pour les habitants ruraux, d’importants facteurs incitatifs pour méliorer leur approvisionnement en eau par leurs propres moyens (auto-approvisionnement). Les évaluations et les projets pilotes d’accélération de l’auto-approvisionnement conduits en Éthiopie, au Mali, en Ouganda et en Zambie montrent qu’encourager l’investissement des ménages peut véritablement constituer une option viable, à côté des services d’eau conventionnels, communau-taires et largement subventionnés. L’auto-approvisionnement, et notamment son accélération, peut aider les gouvernements et les planificateurs à atteindre les cibles des OMD en matière d’accès à l’eau potable, et in fine l’accès universel, en particulier dans les zones difficiles à desservir de manière appropriée au niveau com-munautaire.

Achievements and Lessons Learned from Uganda Self-Supply Pilot Project (2006 - 2008) 34th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009

Downloads: 25


Author: KIWANUKA, J.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

This document provides the achievements and lessons learned from the Uganda self-supply pilot Project (2006-2008). The pilot project followed a research study undertaken in 2005 that indicated that self-supply initiatives existed in the Uganda rural water sector. Following the study a pilot project was launched in September 2006 and involved engagement of two local NGOs with support from Government.

An Assessment of the EMAS Pump and its Potential for Use in Household Water Systems in Uganda University of South Florida MSc Thesis

Downloads: 85


Author: CARPENTER, J. D.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: Graduate Theses and Dissertations
Institution:

Rural improved water supply coverage in Uganda has stagnated around 64% for a number of years and at this point more than 10 million rural people do not have access to an improved drinking water source. It has been recognized that progress toward improved water supply coverage and increased service levels may be gained through Government and nongovernmental organization (NGO) support of private investment in household and shared water supplies, commonly known as Self-supply.
There are indications that low-cost wells and underground rainwater tanks are applicable in many parts of Uganda and could be paired with an EMAS Pump to achieve significant affordability for Self-supply household water systems. Recommendations are provided in terms of the feasibility of introducing the EMAS Pump as a part of Self-supply strategies in Uganda.

An Introduction to Self Supply - Putting the User First Incremental improvements and private investment in rural water supply

Downloads: 44


Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2008
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This field note provides the reader with an introduction to self-supply. Self Supply is the improvement to house-hold or community water supply through user investment in water treatment, supply construction and up-grading, and rainwater harvesting.

An Introduction to Self­ Supply Putting the User First Incremental improvements and private investment in rural water supply

Downloads: 262


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: SKAT/RWSN / WSP
Institution:

Self­ Supply is an initiative which complements the conventional communal supply generally f­unded by the government, and later f­orms the backbone of­ rural water supply. It is an approach that aims to improve household or community water supply through user investment in water treatment, supply construction and upgrading, as well as rainwater harvesting.

An Investigation into the Impacts and Challenges of Implementing Self Supply in Eastern Uganda MSc Thesis Academic Year 2006/7

Downloads: 28


Author: TILLETT, W.
Year of Publishing: 2007
Publisher: Cranfield University
Institution:

A Self Supply Pilot Project’ was established in 2006, to determine the scope for externally supporting incremental improvements to these ‘self supply’ sources. It was implemented by two Ugandan NGOs in Eastern Uganda; UMURDA and WEDA, in Bugiri and Amuria Districts, respectively.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

An investigation into the potential to reduce the cost of constructed rainwater harvesting tanks in Uganda MSc Thesis Academic Year 2006/7

Downloads: 58


Author: CRUDDAS, P.
Year of Publishing: 2007
Publisher: Cranfield University
Institution:

Uganda is a country in the humid tropics, with a climate favourable for the utilisation of rainwater harvesting as a significant source of water for domestic purposes. In the last decade rainwater harvesting has seen increased exposure as a promising solution for increasing safe water coverage in the country, although its widespread implementation is hindered by high per capita costs compared to more conventional, communal water supply schemes. It is also noted that rainwater projects are more expensive in Uganda than other countries.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

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