RWSN Resources

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Technology Transfer Newsletter April 2005

Downloads: 9


Author: BAUMANN, E.
Year of Publishing: 2005
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN) grew out of the Handpump Technology Network (HTN) when the network broadened its mission from handpumps to focus on rural water supply. The three new flagship activities (drilling, sustainable handpumps and self-supply)

Progress Report on Self Supply/Risk Reduction in Mali

Downloads: 10


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: UNICEF, WSP

This report summarises progress up to April 2009 with respect to the risk reduction/self supply approach being followed in Mali to encourage households to improve their water supplies. Over 150 traditional wells have improved protection as a result of this approach.

En quête de solutions d'auto-approvisionnement en eau Des études de terrain aux interventions pilotes en Ouganda

Downloads: 12


Author: CARTER, R. C.
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: WSP

Cette note présente les enseignements d?une étude portant sur différentes expériences d'amélioration de l'auto-approvisionnement en eau en Ouganda. Elle formule des recommandations quant aux meilleurs moyens pour les professionnels du secteur de collabore.

5ème Forum RWSN 2006 - Ghana

Downloads: 13


Author: JONES, J. et J. DOYEN
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Amplifier l'Entreprenariat Local en matière d'Approvisionnement en Eua en Milieu Rural pour atteindre les OMDs Compte Rendu en Francais

Field report visit to Luapula Province - October 2007

Downloads: 13


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2007
Publisher: SWL Consultants
Institution: RWSN

This is a short report outlining the findings from a field visit to examin the progress of Self Supply in Luapula Province, Zambia.

The risks of a technology-based MDG indicator for rural water supply 33rd WEDC International Conference, Accra, Ghana, 2008

Downloads: 13


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2008
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

The MDG indicator for access to safe water equates technology with water quality based largely on designed rather than observed capacity to block routes of faecal contamination. This is a useful driver for donor and government investment in rural water supplies but does not show the whole story.

Self Supply in Mali Early Steps towards an Innovatory Approach

Downloads: 13


Author: OSBERT, N. and S. SUTTON
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

The introduction of a new concept cannot be rushed. It is necessary to go through a process in which stakeholders have the opportunity, at various stages, to assess its relevance to them as members of government or local administration and, most of all, as end-users. Mali was one of the first countries to start this process with respect to Self Supply in rural water.

Self Supply Pilot Water Source History

Downloads: 14


Author: MAGALA MPALANYI, J.
Year of Publishing: 2008
Publisher: Ministry of Water and Environment, Republic of Uganda
Institution: Directorate of Water Development

The Directorate for Water Development (DWD) commissioned an investigation into Self Supply initiatives to water supply in south and Eastern Uganda in 2005. Findings from the study provided plenty of evidence of private and community initiatives to construct and maintain water points.

Assessing the Potential for Self Supply in Zambia 34th WEDC International Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2009

Downloads: 15


Author: MUNKONGE, M. A. and P. HARVEY
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: WEDC - Water, Engineering and Development Centre
Institution:

The Millennium Development Goal target for safe water supply is currently unlikely to be met in Zambia. In order to serve the population that is unlikely to be reached under conventional community-based water supply programmes, alternative approaches to water supply service provision need to be explored. One such alternative is the Self Supply approach which encourages households to develop and improve their own infrastructure incrementally.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Short Summary on RWSN & World Vision Webinar series on Self-supply February & March 2015

Downloads: 15


Author: OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution: RWSN

This short summary highlights some of the issues that emerged from the presentations and discussions.

Improving household water supply (Self Supply) - The Potential in Mali

Downloads: 18


Author: SUTTON, S., MAIGA, B. and H. MAIGA
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: SWL Consultants, UNICEF, WaterAid

This document is based on the study undertaken by WaterAid and the Ministry of Health in June 2005 (funded by RWSN/ WSP-World Bank) as well as on national statistics and policy documents. It provides background information on the situation to date.

Report on Ethiopia Self Supply Initiatives and Potential 2007 Based partly on Experiences from Waliso, Becho and Ilu woredas, Oromia Region, May 2009

Downloads: 18


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2007
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This report outlines the findings of a recent visit to three woredas in Oromia Region to look at the results on the ground, the implications for a package ‘Self Supply’ approach and to a small degree the potential for expansion of the idea. It is structured according to the four main building blocks of Self Supply – technology, finance, private sector and government which can all support private initiative and ownership.

Accélérer l’auto-approvisionnement Une étude de cas de l’Ouganda 2010 RWSN Field Note 2010-5

Downloads: 18


Author: Danert K. and S. Sutton
Year of Publishing: 2011
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

En Ouganda, le Ministère de l’Eau et de l’Environnement, ainsi que de nombreuses ONG, ont plusieurs années d’expérience dans la promotion de la collecte d’eau de pluie pour usage do-mestique et dans le pilotage de projets d’amélioration par les ménages de puits creusés à la main. Il apparaît que de nom-breux ménages sont capables et désireux d’investir dans l’amélioration de leur système d’approvisionnement en eau. Cette note de terrain explique comment ces investissements ont été encouragés entre la fin des années 1990 et 2010, et expose quelques enjeux principaux, alors que le pays élabore un Plan d’orientation pour accélérer l’accès fiable à de l’eau potable par l’auto-approvisionnement en Ouganda. Ces enjeux comprennent l’élaboration de directives claires, la formation du secteur privé et la mise en relation avec des mécanismes de financement et de planification.

Study of the Potential of Self Supply for Rural Drinking Water Provision in Zambia

Downloads: 19


Author: ROCHE, N.
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: Water and Sanitation Program (WSP)
Institution:

This study was commissioned to follow up on a previous study called RITS conducted a few years ago. It examines what has happened since that research concluded in 2002, including social surveys and water quality analysis and put forward recommendations on a way forward in relation to “self supply”. Self supply is the term put to water sources that are provided at the initiative of householders and owned by that householder but shared as a social good with a small number of neighbouring households.

Upgraded Family Wells in Zimbabwe Household Level Water Supplies for Multiple Uses

Downloads: 19


Author: ROBINSON, O.
Year of Publishing: 2002
Publisher: WSP/World Bank
Institution:

Most drinking-water programmes of governments, NGOs and external support agencies concentrate on public supplies, for domestic purposes only. In Zimbabwe, however, the long-established upgraded family well (UFW) programme has two particularly interesting features. Each household invests in and manages its own water supply without depending on the government for maintenance; the same water source is often used for both domestic and productive purposes, which can considerably increase the incomes of poor people.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

Impact and Potential of Self Supply in Amuria District, Uganda MSc Thesis Academic Year 2006/7

Downloads: 21


Author: ALFORD, D.
Year of Publishing: 2007
Publisher: Cranfield University
Institution:

Although greater funding is being channelled to the water sector, new approaches are needed if international targets for safe water supply are to be met in rural areas. Supported self-supply is one such approach. By focussing on building a supporting environment, supported self-supply builds on local initiatives, seeking to encourage and improve them. A pilot project was initiated in 2006 in Uganda to explore the potential of such an approach.

DISCLAIMER: This is a non-RWSN publication and endorsement by RWSN or any of its member organisations should not be inferred.

National Consultative Workshop on Self Supply June 4-6 2008, Wolisso, Ethiopia Report on Presentations, Discussions and Follow up Actions

Downloads: 21


Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2008
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: UNICEF, WSP

In 2007 WSP/ RWSN supported a reconnaissance survey in a part of Oromia to look at the potential for Self Supply and link it to developments in other countries. This rekindled interest in the approach and a concept paper reviewing the UAP strategy was written in March 2008 to bring Self Supply more strongly into the strategy

Potential for Self Supply and Low Cost Water Supply Options in Niger

Downloads: 21


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2006
Publisher: SWL Consultants
Institution: UNICEF

This report examines the potential for self supply and low cost water supply options in Niger. Niger lies to the South of the Sahara with 75% of the territory being desert and a third of the population living in extreme poverty.

Self-Supply as a means of bringing water to the people of Zimbabwe and its relation to the hand pump program.

Downloads: 21


Author: Morgan, P.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Aquamor Pvt. Ltd.
Institution:

The concept of “self-supply” as a means of providing water to families (who become responsible for their own supply) is becoming increasingly common in Zimbabwe. However there is nothing new in it. For well over half a century, thousands of families living in the rural areas of Zimbabwe had dug their own wells as a means of providing water for domestic and agricultural use. And many families have built tanks to catch rainwater. Rain water harvesting is another method which could fall under the concept of self-supply. A communal hand pump water supply program to support communities living in the rural areas had also begun in the 1930’s when the Bush Pump, then known as the Murgatroyd pump, after its inventor, first began to provide water in Matabeleland. The hand pump supply, supported by the governments Department of Water, subsequently spread throughout the country. In later years the on site management of the Hand Pump programme was and is managed by the District Development Fund. For the cities and towns, water is supplied through municipal piped water supplies, largely supplied from dams and reservoirs. However many people living in the urban areas also used their own wells and boreholes excavated on their own property. And self-supply in the cities is now becoming common.

Preliminary Report on Self Supply, Luapula Provence, Zambia

Downloads: 23


Author: SUTTON, S.
Year of Publishing: 2009
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: UNICEF, WSP

In June 2008 UNICEF entered into an agreement to fund the piloting of Self Supply in rural water in three districts of Luapula province. The agreement was with WaterAid in Milenge and Development Aid from People to People (DAPP) in Chiengi, Nchelenge.

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