RWSN Resources

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Rural Water Supply Network - Annual Report 2016 Enabling practitioners, professionals and ultimately water users to make informed decisions on how to improve and maintain access to safe water in rural areas.

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Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2017
Publisher: Skat Foundtion
Institution: Rural Water Supply Network

The focus for the Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN) in 2016 was preparing for, and managing the 7th RWSN Forum in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, from 29th November to 2nd December with the title “Water for Everyone”. This was the first RWSN Forum to take place in a francophone country in the 25 years since the creation of the network.

Throughout 2016 specific in-country activities included a short-course on Procurement, Contract Management and Costing and Pricing in Zambia and a participative analysis of Manual Drilling in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Workshops organized by the World Bank in Bangkok and Lima on sustainable services drew together government agencies in both regions. Key lessons from both events fed into the RWSN Forum under the RWSN Theme “Sustainable Services”.

RWSN continued to work on strengthening the links between research and practice on groundwater by disseminating the outputs from UPGro (Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor) research to the RWSN membership as well as fostering direct linkages between groundwater experts and water supply professionals.

Local Government and Rural Water Services that last: a way forward Rural Water Supply Reality Check

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Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2017
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution:

This paper is a synthesis of the major themes discussed during the local government e-discussion held during May 2015, which included 75 contributions from 58 people presenting experiences in English, French and Spanish and cases from 43 different countries from across the globe. Each week focused on a specific theme. Dedicated week facilitators introduced the theme in the beginning of the week, led the discussion during the week and summarised the main discussion points at the end of the week. The paper highlights the discussed role local government can and does play in ensuring sustainable water service provision, the challenges that local government is facing in fulfilling these roles and responsibilities, and the opportunities for overcoming these challenges.

Proceedings of the 7th RWSN Forum 29 Nov - 2 Dec 2016, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire

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Author: FUREY, S. G. (editor)
Year of Publishing: 2017
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution: RWSN

The 2016 Rural Water Supply Network Forum in Abidjan was the first global gathering to consider the practical challenge of how everyone worldwide can get access to safe, affordable water by 2030. It was also the first RWSN Forum to take place in a francophone country, in the 25 years since the creation of the network.
The Forum gathered 467 rural water sector practitioners from over 300 organisations from 64 countries in Africa, Asia, Americas, and Europe, in a bilingual (English/French) four day event. It was opened by the Prime Minister of Côte d’Ivoire, Mr Daniel Kaplan Duncan. We were joined by HE State Minster James Dengchol Tot, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Electricity of Ethiopia, as well as a delegation from AMCOW.

This Forum proceedings compiles all peer-reviewed materials. Separate downloads and links to the films can be found at: https://rwsn7.net/content/

Rural Water Supply Network: Governance, Roles and Responsibilities January 2016 to December 2018

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Author: Rural Water Supply Network
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: RWSN

Founded as the Handpump Technology Network (HTN) in 1992, by 2015, RWSN has grown from a small group of technical experts focusing on handpumps to a vibrant network of over 8,000 individuals working for over 1,300 organisations 148 countries. RWSN now covers a wide range of issues. This document sets out RWSN’s governance, roles and responsibilities, and was approved by the RWSN Executive Steering Committee in December 2015. This document covers the period January 2016 to December 2018. However, given the evolving nature of the network, earlier modifications, to be approved by the Executive Steering Committee, may be required.

Rural Water Supply Network - Annual Report 2015 Enabling practitioners, professionals and ultimately water users to make informed decisions on how to improve and maintain access to safe water in rural areas.

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Author:
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: RWSN

Firstly, we would like to thank the numerous RWSN members who have contributed to the lively discussions that took place throughout 2015 on our Dgroups, LinkedIn and webinar platforms. We also thank those who share their ideas and opinions more privately with the secretariat and theme leaders.

The RWSN Secretariat and theme leaders were able to undertake their work thanks to the financial and in-kind support from: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) Department for International Development (DFID), Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) – through the UPGro programme, IRC, National Ground Water Association, Oxford University – through the REACH programme, RAIN Foundation, Skat Consulting Ltd., SKH, UNICEF, Volkart Stiftung, WaterAid, World Bank, World Vision, and ZH2O. Thank you very much for your involvement and on-going support for the work of the network.

Rainwater Harvesting in Thailand: Learning from the World Champions RWSN Field Note 2016-1

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Author: Matthias Saladin
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: RWSN

This field note provides an overview and analysis of the historic developments of promoting Domestic Rainwater Harvesting (DRWH) in Thailand between 1980 and 2015. Based on literature reviews and interviews with stakeholders a series of factors were identified which made the promotion of DRWH in Thailand an exceptionally successful example of diffusion of innovations. Among the key factors identified were policies, market structure, pre-existing habits, affordability, supply chain and climate. No single factor was decisive but several of them occurring simultaneously made it possible for an enabling environment to form and make the initiative flourish even after government funding ran out (most of the Thai Jars, which are most commonly used for rainwater storage, were actually delivered through the private sector and paid by the consumers).
In spite of its large-scale success, the Thai Jar Experience is not a blueprint for replication elsewhere but points out to the importance of cultural and economic aspects, as well as to an enabling environment in general.

Professional Water Well Drilling A UNICEF Guidance Note

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Author: Danert K., Gesti Canuto J.
Year of Publishing: 2016
Publisher: Skat Foundation
Institution: Unicef

This guidance note provides practical guidance for organisations and individuals that are trying to raise the professionalism of groundwater development in Africa. The guidance note is mainly concerned with rural and small towns’ water supplies but is mindful of the huge challenges faced by supplies in many growing African cities dealing with problems of groundwater quantity and quality.

DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.21914.64964

Investment in rural water supply delivers results Briefing note on key findings from the Joint Monitoring Programme 2015 report1 relating to rural water supply

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Author: RWSN
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher:
Institution: RWSN

New figures from the Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) of UNICEF and the World Health Organisation (WHO) show that most countries have achieved substantial progress towards achieving universal access to water for their citizens.

Manual Drilling Compendium 2015 RWSN Publication 2015-2

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Author: DANERT K.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: Skat
Institution: Skat

Manual drilling refers to several drilling methods that rely on human energy to construct a borehole and complete a water supply. The various techniques can be used in areas where formations are quite soft and groundwater is relatively shallow.

Manual drilling can provide safe drinking water. The equipment can easily be transported to remote, or difficult to serve populations which would otherwise be left behind. The lower costs compared to machine drilling are appreciated by households, businesses and governments. Manual drilling also provides local employment.

Manual drilling methods are being used to provide water for drinking and other domestic needs at least 36 countries around the world. In some places, manual drilling methods are well established.

The compendium provides a useful overview for those wishing to further examine the impacts and challenges of manual drilling, and, more importantly, improve practices on the ground. It is hoped that the document will spur others to undertake fur-ther studies as well as research to document stories and analyse the promotion, uptake and use of manually drilled boreholes. In addition, the compendium should also enable those promoting manual drilling to realise that they are certainly not alone in their endeavours!

Handpump Standardisation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Seeking a Champion RWSN Publication 2015-1

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Author: MacArthur, J.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

Handpump standardisation is the formal or informal mechanism that governs the varieties of community handpumps used within a particular country. In a handful of countries this also includes stand-ard handpump designs. With over a million handpumps in sub-Saharan Africa and new installations every day, handpump standardisation is still vital for the policy and practices of governments and implementing organisations. While rural water practitioners are polarised about the future of formal standardisation, the extent of informal standardisation is of significant importance to the sustain-ability of handpumps across the continent. Of the thirty-five countries in sub-Saharan using handpumps, formal standardisation has emerged in fifteen through regulations (nine countries), and endorsements (six countries). However in the remaining countries, informal standardisation determines what handpumps are installed where, either through recommendations (fourteen countries), or de facto standardisation (six countries).

Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN) 2012 to 2014 Three-Year Report

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Author: Furey, S. & Danert, K.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: RWSN

Founded as the Handpump Technology Network (HTN) in 1992, RWSN has grown from a small group of technical experts focusing on handpumps. Today, RWSN is a vibrant network of 6,000 individuals from over 1,300 organisations in more than 140 countries. The network is governed and managed by representatives from the African Development Bank (AfDB), IRC, Skat Foundation, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), WaterAid and the World Bank. RWSN recognises the rights and the natural justice of all citizens to enjoy secure water services, regardless of location, lifestyle, gender, age, disability, ethnicity or income. Most of RWSN’s members are actively involved in improving rural water supplies, and every member can contribute to the network in one way or another.

RWSN Member Survey 2015 Infographic Summary and Synthesis Report

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Author: FUREY S. G.
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: Skat

In an on-going effort to improve the quality of the service provided by the Rural Water Supply Network and the Secretariat, an online survey was launched in July and kept open for four weeks. The survey was publicised through Dgroups, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and via RWSN steering committee member organisations. over 600 complete and partial responses were logged by the SurveyMonkey software, which is roughly 10% of membership (though non-members also responded), however the actual number completing all the questions in the survey was 329 - similar to 2014

This document summarises the responses and aggregates the answers from the three languages offered: English, French and Spanish.

The Secretariat would like to thank everyone who took the time to participate in this survey.

A Decade of WPM RWSN: Mapping and Monitoring

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Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

The first webinar reviewed the development of WPM over the past decade, focusing on Malawi, the first country in which the practice was introduced. The key presenters provided dual perspectives of NGO and government actors, which demonstrated the varied methodologies for reporting water supply data, the extent to which data monitoring has impacted decision making and its role in extending equitable and sustainable service delivery. Presentations and discussion assessed the practice, policy, tools and technologies of monitoring and WPM, following its evolution and bringing to question whether WPM is currently a practical and sustainable solution given the reality of resources and government capacities.

Failure and the Future Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

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Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

The fourth and final webinar in the RWSN Water Point Mapping series provided a candid account of the challenges with WPM that have led to failed objectives. There are, however, valuable lessons to be learned from those failures, and the experiences have provided useful models and contributed to improved knowledge and data banks. The webinar also discussed the future of WPM, including new models and initiatives to maximize the benefit of data monitoring and improve information accessibility and transparency.

District Monitoring Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

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Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This second webinar visited case studies of district monitoring experiences in Ethiopia, Bolivia and Ghana to review the methods, costs, challenges and lessons to be learned from each experience.

National Monitoring Water Point Mapping and Monitoring Series

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Author: Pearce, J, E. Greggio, and E. Stephens
Year of Publishing: 2015
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This third webinar in the series explores the latest state-of-play in national level monitoring of rural water supply, which presentations also of country-led monitoring systems. In these systems, information is collected, analysed and used to inform decentralized resource allocation. Case studies of national monitoring models were reviewed to understand the approaches used in embedding the systems and processes required for maintaining accurate and timely rural water supply information. These case studies also demonstrate the impact monitoring has had on extending equitable and sustainable service delivery and provide key learning points.

Costing and Pricing - A Guide for Water Well Drilling Enterprises RWSN Publication 2014-12

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Author: DANERT, K., LUUTU, A., CARTER, R., & OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This field note is written for water well drilling enterprises as well as other agencies which manage, or are involved in drilling projects. Using a step-by-step approach it gives clear guidance on how to cost and price the construction of drilled water wells. It also provides tips on business management with an emphasis of the realities faced in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Once you are familiar with this field note, you will be in a much stronger position to calculate drilling costs, consider prices and deal with business realities.

Siting of Drilled Water Wells - A Guide for Project Managers RWSN Publication 2014-11

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Author: CARTER, R., CHILTON, J., DANERT, K. & OLSCHEWSKI, A.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: RWSN
Institution:

This field note has been written for managers of water supply programmes and projects. It provides a step by step guide on the siting of drilled water wells. As a first step, the essential requirements for a simple groundwater model are set out, including some basic explanations to help the reader establish a sound understanding of hydrogeology.

Sustainable Groundwater Development: use, protect and enhance RWSN Publication 2014-9

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Author: FUREY S. G. & DANERT K.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: RWSN
Institution: Skat, SDC, UNICEF, DFID, DEW Point

This RWSN publication is to help create a better understanding of the crucial importance of groundwater and to highlight the risk to its sustainability. It is intended for politicians, policy makers, government partners and the public. It advocates responsible groundwater use and cautions against abuse. It encourages users of groundwater to protect and enhance this precious resource for the long term benefit of the most vulnerable communities who primarily use hand pumps.

Supervising Water Well Drilling A guide for supervisors

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Author: ADEKILE, D.
Year of Publishing: 2014
Publisher: Rural Water Supply Network
Institution: RWSN/UNICEF

Good supervision of water well drilling is essential for the provision of long-lasting water wells. This guidance note assists geologists and engineers in charge of the supervision of borehole construction as well as project managers. It can be used to prepare for training, and as a manual.
This guide details the responsibilities of the drilling supervisor at the different stages of borehole construction. It explains the actions to be carried out at each stage that will ensure that the driller delivers the borehole as specified in the contract.

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