RWSN Collaborations

Total Results: 7 • Page 1 of 1

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Start Year End Year Title

'Smart Handpumps' Handpumps can be better - who is leading the way?

Project start: • Project finished:
Collaborators: Several
Funder: Several

Summary:
Drilling a borehole and installing a handpump is a common way to improve access to water for rural (and urban) people in many parts of the world. However, the failure of these water points is shockingly high, a third in many African and Asian countries and often much higher.

New communications technology is opening up the possibilities for 'Smart Handpumps' - handpumps that actively record how and when they are used and transmits that data to an organisation who can use that information to (a) mobilise targeted maintenance and repairs; (b) identity priority areas for future improvements and investments; (c) to understand the user needs better, and main other reasons that shift rural water supply away from 'fire-and-forget' projects and towards water services that last and that reach everyone.

Professionalising Manual Drilling UNICEF, Skat Foundation

Project start: 2013 • Project finished: 2014
Collaborators: UNICEF, Skat Foundation
Funder: UNICEF, Skat Foundation

Summary:
Building and supporting local enterprises to develop markets and undertake manual drilling in a professional manner.

REACH: Improving water security for the poor A global research programme to improve water security for millions of poor people in Asia and Africa.

Project start: 2015 • Project finished: 2022
Collaborators: Oxford University, UNICEF, Water and Land Resource Centre, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, icddr,b, University of Dhaka, University of Nairobi, IFPRI, IWA, RWSN, IRC.
Funder: DFID

Summary:
REACH is a seven-year, global programme of research (2015-2022) led by Oxford University and funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) that aims to improve water security for over 5 million poor people by 2022.

As a Research into Action partner, the Rural Water Supply Network will support the design and implementation of the programme’s communications strategy, supporting the uptake of the research findings and ensuring that they translate into positive policy and practice outcomes.

Southern Africa Self-supply Study Review of Self-supply and its support services in African countries

Project start: 2015 • Project finished: 2016
Collaborators: UNICEF, Skat
Funder: UNICEF

Summary:
Over the recent decades, in many countries, significant progress has been achieved in improving access to rural water supplies. However, it will be almost impossible to reach universal access by using community supply models alone, as this approach will simply be too costly. For achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and ensuring universal access to water for all, new approaches and a shift in mindset and policies are needed.

Supported Self-supply is a very cost effective service delivery approach which is complementary to communal supplies, is aligned with Human Rights principles, supports equity and inclusiveness and achieving several SDGs.

Sustainability Assessment of Rural Water Service Delivery Models Findings of a Multi-Country Review

Project start: 2016 • Project finished: 2017
Collaborators: The World Bank, Aguaconsult, IRC
Funder: The World Bank

Summary:
Failure by governments and development partners to ensure sustained access to basic water supplies in rural areas is, to a large extent, the result of inadequate investment to deliver infrastructure where needed. It is also the result of a failure to ensure that infrastructure, once in place, continues to effectively provide the expected services over time.
Impressive gains from the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) era remain fragile and at risk, with various empirical studies indicating that 30 percent to 40 percent of rural water infrastructure is not functioning or functions below expected service levels (RWSN 2010).

Tapping Treasure: Cost-Effective Boreholes in Sierra Leone

Project start: 2013 • Project finished: 2014
Collaborators: Skat Foundation, Ministry of Water Resources Sierra Leone, WASH Facility Sierra Leone, UKaid
Funder: Department for International Development

Summary:
Borehole drilling is relatively underdeveloped in Sierra Leone compared to other countries in West Africa despite its potential. An eight-month project “Tapping Treasure: Cost-effective boreholes in Sierra Leone” supports: (i) government and NGOs to develop their capacity to manage borehole drilling and (ii) drillers to manage risks. The project will contribute to increasing the demand for boreholes, reducing the cost of drilling and improving construction quality.

UPGro - Unlocking the Potential for Groundwater for the Poor

Project start: 2013 • Project finished: 2019
Collaborators: Skat Foundation, Richard Carter & Associates + research teams from across Africa and Europe.
Funder: UK's Department for International Development (DFID), Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and in principle the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

Summary:
A social and natural science approach to enabling sustainable use of groundwater for the benefit of the poor.

Une approche par les sciences sociales et naturelles pour une utilisation durable des eaux souterraines en faveur des populations pauvres

Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor (UPGro), is a new seven-year international research programme which is jointly funded by UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). It focuses on improving the evidence base around groundwater availability and management in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to enable developing countries and partners in SSA to use groundwater in a sustainable way in order to benefit the poor.